Greta Moran | Civil Eats

Authors

Greta Moran is a Senior Reporter for Civil Eats based in Queens, New York. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, Grist, Pacific Standard, The Guardian, Teen Vogue, The New Republic, The New York Times, The Intercept, and elsewhere. Greta writes narrative-based stories about public health, climate change, and environmental justice, especially with a lens on the people working toward solutions.

In the Battle Over the Right to Repair, Open-Source Tractors Offer an Alternative

The Oggún Tractor. (Photo courtesy of Ronnie Baugh Tractors)

As Drought Intensifies, a Return to Wild, Less Restricted Waterways Offers Solutions

journalist and author erica gies and the cover of her new book

‘Right to Repair’ Advocates Petition the FTC to Investigate John Deere 

A Woman is trying to repair her John Deere tractor

NYC Community Gardeners Might Have New Protection in the Fight Against Development

The Garden of Eden in the Bronx. (Photo credit: Greta Moran)

Many Restaurants Pay Tipped Workers Next to Nothing. Does that Violate their Civil Rights?

Female restaurant worker with her back to us with three pizzas in her hands on the restaurant terrace

Beginning Farmers, Farmers of Color Outbid as Farmland Prices Soar

Could Climate Change Make Food Less Nutritious?

old man checking ripe rice in autumn

The Resurgence of Waffle Gardens Is Helping Indigenous Farmers Grow Food with Less Water

Curtis Quam's waffle garden, which he tends with his family. (Courtesy of Curtis Quam)

Did the First UN Food Systems Summit Give Corporations Too Much of a Voice?

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 25: Foreign Minister of Russia Sergey Lavrov addresses the 76th Session of the U.N. General Assembly at U.N. headquarters on September 25, 2021 in New York City. More than 100 heads of state or government are attending the session in person, although the size of delegations are smaller due to the Covid-19 pandemic. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz - Pool/Getty Images)

Could Climate Change Put an End to Arizona’s Alfalfa Heyday?

Stacks of rectangle hay bales stacked high in the Mohave Valley Arizona