Authors

Georgina Gustin, InsideClimate News

Georgina Gustin is a Washington-based reporter who has covered food policy, farming and the environment for more than a decade. She started her journalism career at The Day in New London, Conn., then moved to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, where she launched the "food beat," covering agriculture, biotech giant Monsanto and the growing "good food" movement. At CQ Roll Call, she covered food, farm and drug policy and the intersections between federal regulatory agencies and Congress. Her work has also appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post and National Geographic's The Plate, among others.

Biden’s Climate Plan Relies on Farmers Who Are Often Climate Skeptics

President-elect Joe Biden (R) and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris (L) look on as Tom Vilsack, U.S. President-elect Joe Biden’s nominee to head the Department of Agriculture, delivers remarks at the Queen Theater December 11, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware.

An Unlikely Alliance of Farm and Environmental Groups Takes on Climate Change

a farmer stares at windmills on his farm as he thinks about climate change and regenerative agriculture

Is Trump’s USDA Ready to Address Climate Change?

Cattle in an Oklahoma feedlot. (USDA photo by Alice Welch)

As Beef Comes Under Fire for Climate Impacts, the Industry Fights Back

Japanese Beef cattle. Photo by japanexterna.se

Investors Join Calls for a Food Revolution to Fight Climate Change

a person eating a large hamburger

Natural Climate Solutions, Including Farm Conservation, Can Reduce Global Warming

Herders cultivating fodder or animal feed that is more resilient to extreme weather changes, using plants that adapt to droughts. The Strengthening Carbon Financing for Regional Grassland Management is promoting climate smart agricultural activities. (Photo credit: Asian Development Bank)

Adding Crushed Volcanic Rock to Farm Soil Could Boost Crops—and Slow Global Warming

Mount Rainier and a farm in the foreground

Could a Meat Tax Be on the Horizon?

shopper looking at meat prices