Andi Murphy Joins Civil Eats as Indigenous Foodways Fellow | Civil Eats

Andi Murphy Joins Civil Eats as Indigenous Foodways Fellow

During this year-long fellowship, Murphy will focus on stories of Indigenous food sovereignty, culture, and more.

andi murphy in a kitchen with a knife and squash

Civil Eats is thrilled to announce that Andi Murphy (Diné) will join our team as our first Indigenous Foodways Fellow. This new, year-long position is designed to support a journalist as they deepen their reporting skills, develop their unique voice, receive valuable mentoring, and publish strong work.

In addition to being a freelance food writer, photographer, speaker, and home cook, Murphy is the creator, host, and producer of the award-winning “Toasted Sister Podcast,” a show that documents the Native American food movement. She’s also an associate producer for the “Native America Calling” radio program, a one-hour national radio show focused on Indigenous issues.

“I’d like to thank Civil Eats for creating this fellowship and devoting space for Indigenous food stories,” said Murphy. “This is a big opportunity for me to educate readers and audiences about the delicious and impressive hard work being done by tribes, communities, and culinary leaders in this very active and complex Indigenous food movement. Their work, backed by culture and a history that extends thousands of years, is happening in every corner of this continent in response to myriad issues that impact Indigenous people, specifically, as well as those who now occupy their land. These food stories need to be told and I’m happy to devote my energy and expertise to bring them to light.”

Murphy grew up on the Navajo reservation in New Mexico. She has a journalism degree from New Mexico State University and has been working in the field since 2011. She lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico with her cats, Carrot and Lucifur.

We profiled Murphy in 2018, and she has reported stories for us as well. We have tracked her impressive work ever since, and look forward to working with her to support her reporting on sovereignty, racism, sexism, politics, and health, as well as stories connecting food, flavor, and culture. Civil Eats has reported on Indigenous Foodways since 2013.

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Since 2009, the Civil Eats editorial team has published award-winning and groundbreaking news and commentary about the American food system, and worked to make complicated, underreported stories—on climate change, the environment, social justice, animal welfare, policy, health, nutrition, and the farm bill— more accessible to a mainstream audience. Read more >

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  1. Katy
    Congratulations Andi... and Civil Eats! Really looking forward to your reporting.

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