Civil Eats to Be Included in the U.S. Library of Congress | Civil Eats

Civil Eats to Be Included in the U.S. Library of Congress

Our 10 years of archives will be preserved among the Library’s historic collection of materials related to U.S. food and foodways.

library of congress interior

The United States Library of Congress has selected Civil Eats for inclusion in the Library’s historic collection of Internet materials related to the Food and Foodways Web Archive.

The Library officially serves the U.S. Congress, and is the de facto national library of the U.S. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the country, and preserves important “cultural artifacts” by providing enduring access to them. Its web archives are an important resource because they capture information that could otherwise be lost. And it sees Civil Eats as an important part of this collection and the historical record.

We’ve been an important part of the Zeitgeist when it comes to national food systems reporting for the last 10 years, and it’s a great honor for our tiny operation to receive a recognition of this magnitude. From capturing the work of sustainable agricultural pioneers to teasing out the impacts of climate change, food insecurity, and state and federal policy, Civil Eats’ reporters have covered many of the most important food and agriculture stories of our time.

Over the course of 2019, we’ve been looking back at many of the issues we cover have changed since we launched 10 years ago. We’ve explored climate change, food and farm labor, school food, animal agriculture, and much more.

We’re grateful for this tremendous distinction and are steadfast in our commitment to continue to report on the most critical food stories out there.

Today’s food system is complex.

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Top photo: Main Reading Room of the Library of Congress in the Thomas Jefferson Building. (Photo CC-licensed by Carol M. Highsmith)

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Since 2009, the Civil Eats editorial team has published award-winning and groundbreaking news and commentary about the American food system, and worked to make complicated, underreported stories—on climate change, the environment, social justice, animal welfare, policy, health, nutrition, and the farm bill— more accessible to a mainstream audience. Read more >

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