Civil Eats Welcomes Matthew Wheeland as New Managing Editor | Civil Eats

Civil Eats Welcomes Matthew Wheeland as New Managing Editor

 The veteran environmental journalist brings vast editorial experience to our team.

Today, Matthew Wheeland joins Civil Eats as our new managing editor. Wheeland, a veteran environmental journalist based in the Bay Area, has worked extensively on a wide range of topics, particularly sustainable business and renewable energy, and is a skilled and experienced editor.

We are thrilled to welcome him to our team and confident his skills and years of editorial experience will bring Civil Eats to the next level of journalistic integrity and success.

Wheeland has served as managing editor of GreenBiz and AlterNet, and writes regularly for The Guardian’s sustainable business section. He is passionate about telling the stories of people, organizations, and practices that are making the world a better place.

He has worked as an environmental journalist since 2002, and earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology from U.C. Santa Cruz and a master’s degree from the U.C. Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, where he studied with Michael Pollan and wrote his master’s project on wildlife-friendly agriculture in California.

“I’ve been a reader and great admirer of Civil Eats’ work for years, and I couldn’t be more excited to join the team and help continue the pioneering work that they have done since 2009,” Wheeland said. “The coming years promise challenges to every aspect of food in the U.S., and there’s no better time to shine a light on the problems that face our food system as well as the people working to make it better.”

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Twilight Greenaway, who previously held the managing editor role, will continue to collaborate with the Civil Eats team as a contributor and in a new role as special projects editor. She’ll be involved with Civil Eats’ numerous media partners on joint reporting projects.

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