Why You Should Give to Civil Eats This Season | Civil Eats

Why You Should Give to Civil Eats This Season

It's #GivingTuesday and there's never been a more important time to support independent food policy journalism.

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This is such an exciting time for the food movement. And, if you’re like me, Civil Eats is an important part of your daily food media diet. It’s my go-to source for food movement news. Civil Eats not only informs readers, but it also challenges us with critical thinking, insight, and commentary.

There has never been a more important time to support independent food policy journalism. I hope you’ll join me in supporting the vital role Civil Eats plays as the primary source for balanced, national conversations about our food system, food politics, and food policy.

Since launching seven years ago, Civil Eats has built a vibrant community and a strong reputation. The James Beard Foundation awarded it its Publication of the Year award in 2014, saying that it “demonstrates fresh direction, worthy ambition, and forward-looking approach to food journalism.” Michael Pollan describes Civil Eats as “the best online food politics magazine.” Alice Waters says, “If you’re passionate about food politics and committed to staying informed, Civil Eats is the most reliable source you’ll find.”

This Giving Tuesday, I hope you’ll consider making a tax-deductible, year-end gift to Civil Eats. The site’s editors and contributors rely on you, their readers, to help them bring you relevant, timely stories that cut to the heart of today’s food system challenges (and solutions).

Please give what you can. All donors at the $250 level will receive a signed copy of one of four books by my friend and Civil Eats’ advisory board member, Ruth Reichl.

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Thanks for joining Michael, Alice, Ruth, and countless others in supporting the terrific work and leadership of Civil Eats in the food movement.

Happy Holidays!

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MARK BITTMAN is one of America’s beloved, best-known and most widely respected food writers. He covered food policy as an Opinion columnist for The New York Times for five years, produced "The Minimalist" column for 13 years, and has starred in several popular television series, including the Emmy-winning Years of Living Dangerously. He recently left the Times to devote his time to cookbooks, teaching at Berkeley, and working on food movement strategy with the Union of Concerned Scientists. He also co-founded Purple Carrot, the national company that delivers weekly vegan meal kits. Bittman has authored more than a dozen cookbooks, including the best-selling How to Cook Everything, How to Cook Everything The Basics, How to Cook Everything Vegetarian (all available as apps), How to Cook Everything Fast, Food Matters, and VB6: Eat Vegan Before 6:00. Read more >

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