All the News That’s Fit to Eat: Neglected Veggies, Expensive Almonds, and Corn Syrup vs. Sugar



Here are some of the stories that caught our attention this week:

Fewer Than 1 In 5 Americans Eat Enough Fruits And Vegetables (International Business Times)

Adults should consume between 1 1/2 and 2 cups of fruit and 2 to 3 cups of vegetables per day. According to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control, in 2013, less than 18 percent of Americans ate the recommended amount of fruits, and less than 14 percent of us at our vegetables.

F.D.A. Delays Deadline for Calorie Count on Menus (The New York Times)

In what consumer advocates said was a setback for public health, the FDA has delayed by a year the deadline for the nation’s chain restaurants, pizza parlors and movie theaters to post calorie counts on their menus.

Almond Prices Surge as Sales Boom Collides With Drought (Bloomberg)

Americans are eating more almonds than ever, but the growth in consumption—coupled with smaller crops due to California’s drought—have sent prices surging to record levels.

Germs Lurk in More Foods, Some Grow Drug-Resistant (Wall Street Journal)

A new food safety problem: Microbes are becoming resistant to many antibiotics used to treat the illnesses they cause.

The U.S. Is Producing a Record Amount of Milk and Dumping the Leftovers (Bloomberg)

Northeast U.S. dairies are dumping more milk than ever as production reaches record highs.

General Mills Will Go 100 Percent Cage-Free (The Humane Society)

General Mills joins the list of companies shifting their egg-purchasing practices away from battery cage confinement systems.

High Nitrate Levels Plague 60 Iowa Cities, Data Show (The Des Moines Register)

Iowa has a statewide nitrate problem: More than 60 Iowa cities and towns have battled high nitrate levels in their drinking water over the past five years.

Corn Processors Take Aim at Sugar (Marketplace)

The corn syrup and sugar industries are in the midst of a legal battle concerning the “naturalness” of their products.

California’s Drought Changes Habits in the Kitchen (The New York Times)

Across California, home cooks and restaurant chefs are adjusting to a new reality in their kitchens.

Perdue Says Half Its Chickens Now Raised Without Any Antibiotics At All (Consumerist)

A year after Perdue announced it would stop using antibiotics that are medically important for humans in its hatcheries, the company has reached a milestone: Half of its chickens are now raised without any antibiotics at all.

José Andrés backs out of restaurant in Donald Trump’s hotel (Washington Post)

D.C.-based chef José Andrés is the latest to cut ties with Donald Trump over his recent statements disparaging immigrants. Another high-profile chef, Geoffrey Zakarian, also dropped out of Trump’s hotel.

Why Sit-Down Meals May Be Just As Unhealthful As Fast Food (National Public Radio)

A new study says eating at a sit-down restaurant can mean even more sodium—and nearly as much saturated fat—as eating at a fast-food joint.

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