Why Give to Civil Eats? We Keep You Informed and Inspired.

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Dear readers,

We hope you’ll think of Civil Eats in your year-end giving.

This has been a big year for us. After our successful Kickstarter campaign late last year, we brought on a paid managing editor, started paying our contributors, and expanded our readership. We were named the James Beard Foundation’s 2014 Publication of the Year and two of our stories were included in Best Food Writing 2014. We’re also reaching more people than ever thanks to our new media partnerships with TIME.com, Harvest Public Media, and Bay Area Bites.

In the last year alone, we’ve published over 250 original articles and worked with a wide array of new and established writers. We’ve dispelled food waste myths, taken a close look at Toledo’s water crisis, investigated right-to-farm amendments, reported on an unexpected connection between BPA and fast food, found holes in McDonalds’s transparency campaign, broke news about salmon fed GMO yeast, and taken an in-depth look at California’s humane egg battle.

We’ve also reported on lots of good news. With funding from the Food + Farming Communications Fund, we created a new series called the Good Food Vanguard and have reported over 40 stories about encouraging and successful efforts to change the food system. We’ve celebrated Brazil’s new dietary guidelines, reported on the rise of suburban agrihoods, the nation’s largest rooftop farm, and projects to incubate food businesses and distribute fresh food in Detroit. We’ve also heard from authors and chefs who inspire us. And we told those of you who want to change the food system where to start.

It’s been quite a year, but we need your help to continue covering the essential stories about the food on your plate. Please consider including Civil Eats in your year-end giving. Your tax-deductible gift will cover:

Thank you for being a loyal reader.

We rely on you. Become a member today to read unlimited stories.

  • One in-depth report: $300
  • Web support for one month: $1,000
  • Editorial services for one month: $5,000

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If you read Civil Eats regularly and appreciate what we do, we’d be grateful for your donation of $30 for an annual membership. Members will receive additional curated gifts throughout the year. Donate $300 or more and we will send you one of our stylish tote bags! Every little bit counts, so please give what you can.

Our goals for next year include paying a fair wage to our editorial staff and producing much more rich, thought-provoking content that will inspire and inform you. You won’t want to miss a single story.

Thank you for your support and have a wonderful Holiday Season!

With gratitude,
The Civil Eats Team

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