Chef José Andrés Ups the Ante: Truffle Dinners for Kickstarter Supporters | Civil Eats

Chef José Andrés Ups the Ante: Truffle Dinners for Kickstarter Supporters

This is it folks! The Civil Eats Kickstarter is in its final hours–our campaign to fund good food journalism and commentary ends just before 5 pm PT on Friday, October 18–and we need your help to make our goal. So far we’ve raised almost $65,000 thanks to our many supporters. If we don’t raise the remaining $35,000, we don’t get to take home anything.

Can you help us spread the word in these last critical hours?

We are so grateful to those of you who have donated to our campaign thus far–your time, your money, and your giveaways. We can seriously feel the love through our glowing screens. Thank you for believing in us and our work.

A heart-felt shout out is in order for Chef José Andrés, who is offering to cook a truffle dinner for four at The Bazaar by José Andrés for a $10k donation to our Kickstarter! For $30k? Chef José will cook a white truffle dinner at his home for six in DC. This is a cool opportunity, but you only have hours to snap it up!

There are still some other great goodies left… hurry over and check it out if you have not yet.

Meanwhile, we now have nice stickers available for a donation of $35 (photo above). Yes, for those of you who really wanted some Civil Eats schwag, but can’t shell out for a tote bag, we thought of you and added a smaller reward. Those of you who donated $25 can now join in the fun for just $10 more!

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Thanks for all your support. And please keep spreading the word!

Naomi, Paula and the Civil Eats team

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