Financial Management and Food 101 (VIDEO) | Civil Eats

Financial Management and Food 101 (VIDEO)

It’s not surprising news: Our food system is not working for us or our planet.

But college students across the country are taking a stand. Through the creation of student run, sustainably sourced food ventures these young people are creating a food system that is good for their bodies, communities, and the planet. 

The Cooperative Food Empowerment Directive is a network and training program for college students starting food cooperatives, and today we are launching a video on financial management that will bring business terms to life using carrot costumes and bacon kale donuts.

Follow up at www.cofed.org to learn more about the cooperative sustainable food businesses that we work with. If seeing students creating real change in their communities inspires you, CoFED invites you to give. We need to raise $5,000 from 50 new donors in the 96 hours after Earth Day in order to get a matched donation from our funders at the 11th Hour Project.  Donate today!

Watch the video on financial management here:

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Yoni Landau is the co-founder and Chief Evangelist of CoFED (the Cooperative Food Empowerment Directive). After launching a successful campaign to prevent the first fast food chain from opening at UC Berkeley, he helped raise over $120,000 for a cooperative alternative, the Berkeley Student Food Collective. He enjoys doing fundraising consulting and organizing #occupy actions in the Bay Area. Read more >

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