New Whistleblower Law Empowers Federal Food Safety Employees | Civil Eats

New Whistleblower Law Empowers Federal Food Safety Employees

‘Tis the season for giving thanks, counting blessings and reflecting on the year past. While many Americans may not be aware, we can all now be grateful that on November 27, President Obama signed the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act (WPEA) into law, providing federal government employees with the power to speak the truth … which consequently gives all consumers the gift of safer eating.

How? Because now, more than 110,000 USDA and FDA employees enjoy solid whistleblower protections, and can feel more secure to speak up when they see something wrong with the food we eat.

Retaliation against truth-telling public servants is an all-too-common scenario, and has caused would-be whistleblowers to keep public health concerns to themselves for far too long. After 13 years of fighting for better protections (including previously losing this battle to an anonymous ‘secret hold’ by a Senator at the last minute in 2010), whistleblower advocates like my group, the Government Accountability Project (GAP) are ecstatic to see this positive step forward.

Before this legislation was enacted, loopholes made it nearly impossible for employees of conscience to escape retaliation or termination for doing what they thought was right – exposing problems in our food system. Now, when a person is not the first one to disclose the particular misconduct, or blows the whistle while carrying out job duties, or makes a disclosure to a supervisor (believe it or not, these were not covered before), s/he is protected against such retaliation. Check out a fuller list of protections here.

The effect of the law is real, and powerful. GAP’s Food Integrity Campaign (FIC) has worked with numerous federal whistleblowers in the past who witnessed threats to our food supply, and would have greatly benefited from these new protections. Just months ago, USDA inspectors sought GAP’s services to help them anonymously voice concerns that the agency’s proposed poultry inspection plan, known as HIMP, would (among other shocking effects) limit federal inspectors to one-third of a second to examine chicken or turkey carcasses, due to increased line speeds. These inspectors didn’t feel secure voicing their objections publicly, knowing they risked demotion or firing for crossing the USDA (Check out this ABC News interview that shadows one of the recent USDA whistleblowers, mafia-source style, to conceal their identity). The now-passed WPEA empowers such brave insiders.

Another key whistleblower who needed better legal safeguards was the late Dr. Dean Wyatt, a former GAP client and USDA public health veterinarian who exposed horrific inhumane handling at two different slaughterhouses. For speaking out, he faced harsh retaliation, including a transfer across the country. Now, veterinarians who face similar experiences have the legal backing in their favor.

newsmatch banner 2022

The battle to empower all food workers is far from over. These new protections make a difference in thefederal sector. And corporate workers exposing problems with FDA-regulated products are covered, thanks to the 2011 Food Safety Modernization Act. However, a gaping hole in protections still exists – those for private industry workers who monitor USDA-regulated products like beef, poultry, and pork. That’s a huge chunk of our food supply that is vulnerable. FIC and others will be working to make those regulations a reality in the coming year.

But remember, for now, there’s much to be thankful for. Each step in improving protections for brave truth-tellers is a step toward better accountability and transparency in our convoluted food system. Let’s keep this momentum going.

An earlier version of this story appeared here.

We’ll bring the news to you.

Get the weekly Civil Eats newsletter, delivered to your inbox.

Today’s food system is complex.

Invest in nonprofit journalism that tells the whole story.

Sarah Damian is New Media Associate for the Government Accountability Project, the nation's leading whistleblower protection and advocacy organization. Read more >

Like the story?
Join the conversation.

  1. C Karen Stopford
    I would be very careful before leaping for joy on this one. Obama, as you well know, has the worst track record of any President regarding whistleblowing - more prosecutions than all other Presidents before him combined - and this may be a way to "out" the troublemakers and get them away from sources of information before more "damage" is done. I am sure Ms. Radack's experience, or that of Tom Drake, Bradley Manning, William Binney, Julian Assange and others are well aware, blowing the whistle can cost you your future earning potential, your reputation, your freedom, and possibly your life. I would rather skip the "formal channels" that allowed the problem to happen anyway, and go straight to Wikileaks or an alternative media outlet like DemocracyNow! or Firedoglake and get the information out that way.

More from

Food Safety

Featured

David Montgomery and Anne Biklé, authors of

Soil Health Is Human Health

Soil-health pioneers David Montgomery & Anne Biklé discuss the nutrient benefits of regenerative practices, and how they may also be a solution to drought in the West.

Popular

A Young Oyster Farmer Carrying on the Family Business

Gaby Zlotkowsky on a boat holding a basket of oysters. (Photo credit: Capshore Photography)

Young People Working for Food Justice in North Carolina

Michael

Young Fishermen Are Struggling to Stay Afloat

Lucas Raymond holding a halibut. (Photo courtesy of the New England Young Fishermen's Alliance)

Young People Are Feeding the Effort to Unionize Food Service Workers

Starbucks employees and union organizers protest outside Starbucks headquarters in fall 2022. (Photo courtesy of Fern Potter)