Why Wild Salmon Is Worth the Fight (VIDEO) | Civil Eats

Why Wild Salmon Is Worth the Fight (VIDEO)

Next year, developers plan to apply for permits for the construction of America’s largest open-pit copper and gold mine, in the heart of Alaska’s most valuable salmon runs. It’s not too late for us to stop them if we act now. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently considering requests from stakeholders to use its power under the Clean Water Act to protect Bristol Bay. FRESH, Parent Earth and Trout Unlimited are combining grassroots forces to take action and I hope you’ll join us by signing the petition!

Pebble Mine would cover 20 square miles in the Bristol Bay watershed, and require the construction of the world’s largest earthen dam for a 10 square mile waste containment pond. Up to 10 billion tons of toxic mine wastes could be produced. Any release of these wastes could cause irreparable damage to the Bristol Bay salmon runs.

Even worse: while our wild salmon are under threat, genetically modified salmon may be introduced to the market any day. Here is exclusive footage with Paul Greenberg, best-selling author of Four Fish. He explains why hybrid Frankensalmon has no place on our tables, especially when we have an abundant, healthy alternative.

Originally published on Huffington Post

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Nicole Betancourt, Founder and CEO of Parent Earth, Inc. and Co-Executive Director of the Parent Earth Foundation, has over 17 years experience in media production and distribution. She has won an Emmy for an HBO documentary, led a web-based media organization as Executive Director and is a Kellogg Food and Society Policy Fellow and a Donella Meadows Fellow. Her work has been praised in the New York Times, USA Today, and Variety, by the Oprah Winfrey Show and at film festivals from Minsk to Taipei. Nicole lives in NYC with her husband and two young girls who inspire her daily. Sarah Schenck is the Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer of Parent Earth Inc. and the Co-Executive Director of Parent Earth Foundation. As the New York City Comptroller’s Senior Advisor for Education, Sarah was commended for excellence in public service and has been honored as a Hepburn Fellow at Bryn Mawr College and a Metropolitan Museum of Art Fellow. She mentors young filmmakers from both her alma maters, Stanford and Bryn Mawr College. Her feature films and short films films have won prizes in the U.S., the U.K., and Belgium. Read more >

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  1. The U.S. population has historically placed a considerable degree of trust in the regulatory oversight provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and its agencies. There is little tradition of people having a close relationship with their food, with the overwhelming majority of people having bought their food in supermarkets for years. But the 2003 survey by the Pew Research Center showed that even in the U.S., 55% see GM food as "bad" food. A 2010 survey found that over one third of U.S. consumers were very or extremely concerned about GM food, a 3% reduction from 2008.
  2. Eating organic food is a great step towards a healthy lifestyle. Unfortunately, many organic fruits and vegetables are a bit more costly. To combat the increased cost, and to ensure that the food you are eating is 100% organic, you may want to start your own organic garden.

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