Food Price Spikes Visualized (INFOGRAPHIC) | Civil Eats

Food Price Spikes Visualized (INFOGRAPHIC)

In the last year, international food prices have reached record peaks. In many countries, high food prices have contributed to unrest, instability, violence and increasing inequality and poverty. While volatile food prices impact everyone, the impacts vary across the globe with the poorest and most vulnerable people often getting the shortest end of the stick.

To shed more light on the impacts of food price spikes, Oxfam has created an interactive map of Food Price Volatility Pressure Points. This map shows the impacts of price spikes in some of the countries where food prices have complicated the lives of poor people and offers a chance to take action on to help address price volatility.

The map shows are areas that are highly vulnerable to price spikes, countries that have had extreme weather events contribute to global price hikes and places that have seen price spikes contribute to violence or unrest that has shaken the foundation of global stability. While this map alone does not tell the full story of how price spikes have impacted our world, it offers a global snapshot to give us a better understanding of what is happening in communities near and far.

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Originally published by Oxfam

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Ben Grossman-Cohen is a Press Officer for Oxfam America’s GROW campaign. He’s a Brooklyn native based in Washington D.C. You can follow him on twitter at @bengroco and read more from him on Oxfam’s Politics of Poverty Blog. Read more >

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