Food Price Spikes Visualized (INFOGRAPHIC) | Civil Eats

Food Price Spikes Visualized (INFOGRAPHIC)

In the last year, international food prices have reached record peaks. In many countries, high food prices have contributed to unrest, instability, violence and increasing inequality and poverty. While volatile food prices impact everyone, the impacts vary across the globe with the poorest and most vulnerable people often getting the shortest end of the stick.

To shed more light on the impacts of food price spikes, Oxfam has created an interactive map of Food Price Volatility Pressure Points. This map shows the impacts of price spikes in some of the countries where food prices have complicated the lives of poor people and offers a chance to take action on to help address price volatility.

The map shows are areas that are highly vulnerable to price spikes, countries that have had extreme weather events contribute to global price hikes and places that have seen price spikes contribute to violence or unrest that has shaken the foundation of global stability. While this map alone does not tell the full story of how price spikes have impacted our world, it offers a global snapshot to give us a better understanding of what is happening in communities near and far.

\"Get ‘}” alt=”” />

Originally published by Oxfam

We’ll bring the news to you.

Get the weekly Civil Eats newsletter, delivered to your inbox.

Today’s food system is complex.

Invest in nonprofit journalism that tells the whole story.

Ben Grossman-Cohen is a Press Officer for Oxfam America’s GROW campaign. He’s a Brooklyn native based in Washington D.C. You can follow him on twitter at @bengroco and read more from him on Oxfam’s Politics of Poverty Blog. Read more >

Like the story?
Join the conversation.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

More from

Food Access

Featured

Popular

GMO Salmon Is (Sort of) on the Market: Here’s What It Means

Shoppers select salmon in a large chain food store in Glendale, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

Our Food and Farming Book Picks for Summer 2022

Op-Ed: Why White Farmers Should Fight for Black Farmer Debt Relief

Lateef Dowdell watches the sunrise from what remains of land once belonging to his uncle Gil Alexander, who was the last active Black farmer in the community of Nicodemus, Kansas. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Will Climate Change Help Hybrid Grapes Take Root in the US Wine Industry?

The Milea Estate from above, where heritage and hybrid grapes are grown for new wines. (Photo courtesy of the Heritage Grape Project)