Kitchen Table Talks SF: Finding New Farmers Among Our Post 9/11 Military Veterans | Civil Eats

Kitchen Table Talks SF: Finding New Farmers Among Our Post 9/11 Military Veterans

Two million young people—many of them from rural backgrounds—have served in the U.S. military since the attacks of 9/11. These veterans are facing extremely hard times, with very high rates of unemployment. Farming can be their ticket to a bright future and they could help solve our nation’s severe shortage of new farmers.

Join us in conversation with Michael O’Gorman, a pioneering organic farmer who leads the Farmer-Veteran Coalition. He will bring a few veterans with him and share a preview of the program he will deliver at the 2011 Eco-Farm conference (The Ecological Farming Association’s Annual Conference).

When: Monday, January 24
Food and drink at 6:30 p.m.; Discussion at 7 p.m.

Where: Viracocha, 998 Valencia Street @ 21st Street, San Francisco

Kitchen Table Talks is a joint venture of CivilEats and 18 Reasons , a non-profit that promotes conversation between its San Francisco Mission neighborhood and the people who feed them. Space is limited, so please RSVP. A $10 suggested donation is requested at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds. Sustainable food and refreshments will be provided, courtesy of Bi-Rite Market and Shoe Shine Wine.

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Jen Dalton is the editor of the Local Eats series, which features how cities all over the United States are rebuilding local food systems from the ground up and conducts interviews for our Faces & Visions of the Food Movement series.  Jen co-produces Kitchen Table Talks, a local food forum in San Francisco and heads up Kitchen Table Consulting which provides strategy and communications services to promote and support sustainable businesses, local economies and good food. Jen is also serves as the Cheese Chair of the Good Food Awards and was the Programs Director for Slow Food Nation '08. Read more >

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