Cast Your Vote For a Hip Hop Video That Captures the "Abnormality" of Junk Food (VIDEO) | Civil Eats

Cast Your Vote For a Hip Hop Video That Captures the “Abnormality” of Junk Food (VIDEO)

Chicago hip hop artist D-Nick The Microphone Misfit teamed up with B-Boy Super inLight to create “Abnormality“, a track for the opening of Graffiti and Grub, the Chicago health food store founded by activist LaDonna Redmond. Their video highlights the physical health issues brought on by artificial, processed foods and encourages us all to look at what we’re putting into our bodies.

D-Nick and Super inLight both embrace the acronym HIP HOP for “Healthy Independent People Helping Other People” and they are doing just that, using their talents to get the word out that “Eating healthy is the first step in disease prevention.” D-Nick has entered the video in The One Chicago, One Nation film contest, whose goal is to reward “videos that tell the stories of people in Chicago from different backgrounds working together for the common good.”

Please watch “Abnormality”, share it with friends, and show your support by voting for D-Nick–voting ends on May 9th:

Lyrics to “Abnormality” by D-Nick The Microphone Misfit:

Freedom from disease and abnormality/
Cause you don’t wanna have that stuff affecting your reality/
C’mon…..

I was Chillin’ with my brother Super InLight/
We were shooting the breeze getting our Mind right/
Laughing, talking, politics, and current events/
Buggin’out about a lot of things that don’t make sense/

And then Super all of a sudden got an urge from his tummy/
He looked up and said, “Yo D! I’m kind of hungry”/
“Help ya self in the kitchen there is food in the cabinet/
He opened up the cabinet and said “I ain’t having it/

newsmatch banner 2022

There ain’t nothing in here except for junk food/
If I eat this It will put me in a junk mood/
No disrespect D don’t mean to be rude/
But Lays chips, French dip c’mon man duuude/

I had no idea you were eating like this/
Why would you ever put that on your grocery list/
This so called food ain’t meant for a human/
If I eat this then my bowels won’t be movin’/

C’mon Super don’t you think you’re jumping the gun/
I just eat this when I’m kicking back and havin’ some fun/
I don’t really need to eat nothing organically grown/
Unless you wanna make your body cancer’s permanent home/

Eating healthy is the first step in disease prevention/
It also cuts down on hypertension/
There’s a few more things I’d like to mention
If you’ll sit back and pay attention

(Chorus)

We’ll bring the news to you.

Get the weekly Civil Eats newsletter, delivered to your inbox.

Freedom from disease and abnormality/
Cause you don’t wanna have that stuff affecting your reality/
Freedom from disease and abnormality/
Cause you don’t wanna have that stuff affecting your reality/

You wouldn’t pay your bills with counterfeit money/
So why would you put something counterfeit in your tummy/
You won’t give ya mama artificial love/
So why would you feast on artificial grub/…

Now that’s something to think about/…

While information is leaking out /
From the lies the scandal from the food pyramid/
The sucka’s who invented that need to do a bid*/

You want…

Today’s food system is complex.

Invest in nonprofit journalism that tells the whole story.

Freedom from disease and abnormality/
Cause you don’t wanna have that stuff affecting your reality/
Freedom from disease and abnormality/
Cause you don’t wanna have that stuff affecting your reality/

Originally published on Eating Liberally

Kerry Trueman is a climate change activist/writer/consultant who advocates low-impact living, healthy eating, sustainable agriculture and related topics in a lively, non-wonky way. She has been a Huffington Post blogger since 2007, and occasional contributor to AlterNet, Grist, Civil Eats, and MomsCleanAirForce. Trueman also wrote the chapter on how to eat ecologically for Rodale's Whole Green Catalog. Read more >

Like the story?
Join the conversation.

More from

General

Featured

Ann Tenakhongva, 62, and her husband, Clark Tenakhongva, 65, sort traditional Hopi Corn at their home on First Mesa on the Hopi Reservation in Arizona on September 28, 2022. The corn comes from the families’ field in the valley between First Mesa and Second Mesa, which Clark had just harvested. The corn is organized on racks to dry out and then stored in cans and bins for years to come. Much of the corn is ground up for food and ceremonial purposes. Corn is an integral part of Hopi culture and spirituality. (Photo by David Wallace)

Climate-Driven Drought Is Stressing the Hopi Tribe’s Foods and Traditions

Most Hopi grow corn with only the precipitation that falls on their fields, but two decades of drought have some of them testing the waters of irrigation and hoping they can preserve other customs with their harvests.

Popular

A Young Oyster Farmer Carrying on the Family Business

Gaby Zlotkowsky on a boat holding a basket of oysters. (Photo credit: Capshore Photography)

Young People Working for Food Justice in North Carolina

Michael

Young Fishermen Are Struggling to Stay Afloat

Lucas Raymond holding a halibut. (Photo courtesy of the New England Young Fishermen's Alliance)

This Mother-Daughter Team Is Sharing Food Traditions from the Ho-Chunk Nation

Elena Terry, (left) and Zoe Fess smile after showcasing Seedy SassSquash, a signature family dish, during the Smithsonian’s