E. coli is Murder? So Says CSI Miami | Civil Eats

E. coli is Murder? So Says CSI Miami

So it turns out that food safety is such a front-page, crazy serious issue, that it has seeped into prime time television scripts, where e. coli is being called murder. Throw in a feedlot shot, some talk of genetically modified seed “drift,” where wind blows patented seeds to a farmer’s field where those seeds are not being used, contaminating the field and giving the patent holder the right to sue. Also mentioned were veggie libel laws and issues around fraudulent organic and industrial organic. Indeed, through the medium of television, there are a lot of pressing issues being put in front of a wide swath of audience who may not have ever heard about “GMOs,” or ever seen a feedlot, but has surely had a relative get food poisoning. Sure, the science is a little weird, and the story is pure Hollywood — but check out what hundreds of thousands of Americans watched Monday on CSI Miami.

h/t Susan Coss and Bill Marler

We’ll bring the news to you.

Get the weekly Civil Eats newsletter, delivered to your inbox.

Today’s food system is complex.

Invest in nonprofit journalism that tells the whole story.

Paula Crossfield is a founder and the Editor-at-large of Civil Eats. She is also a co-founder of the Food & Environment Reporting Network. Her reporting has been featured in The Nation, Gastronomica, Index Magazine, The New York Times and more, and she has been a contributing producer at The Leonard Lopate Show on New York Public Radio. An avid cook and gardener, she currently lives in Oakland. Read more >

Like the story?
Join the conversation.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. Check out Slow Food USA staffer Patrick Keeler's take, "CSI: organics": http://www.slowfoodusa.org/index.php/slow_food/blog_post/csi_organics/

More from

Food Safety

Featured

Popular

Black Farmers in Arkansas Still Seek Justice a Century After the Elaine Massacre

Eugene

Meet the Group That’s Been Bringing Bison Back to Tribal Lands for 30 Years

The Fort Belknap Indian Reservation in Harlem, Montana, has gathered an estimated 45 buffalo during two ITBC transfers in 1996 and 2014. (Photo courtesy of the InterTribal Buffalo Council)

As the Ukraine Invasion Disrupts the Sunflower Oil Supply Chain, Small US Producers Step Up

sunflowers in a field in northern california

California Takes a Step Toward Restricting Bee-Killing Pesticides

Close-up of honey bee pollinating almond blossom in Northern California almond orchard. California contributes over 80% to the worldwide almond market with many of those almonds being grown in Butte County.