Community Organizing: Addressing Food Access and Security in Bayview Hunters Point | Civil Eats

Community Organizing: Addressing Food Access and Security in Bayview Hunters Point

Kitchen Table Talks announced its third installment of its new conversation series about the American food system. Community Organizing: Addressing Food Access and Security in Bayview Hunters Point will be held on Tuesday, July 28 from 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. at the architecture offices of Sagan-Piechota in San Francisco.

Guest speakers Jeffrey Betcher, Bayview Hunters Point resident, community organizer and co-founder of the Quesada Gardens Initiative and Gina Fromer, Executive Director of Bayview YMCA and food security activist, will discuss the importance of community organizing in addressing food access and security needs in the Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood.

For nearly 20 years, residents of Bayview Hunters Point have been asking for better access to quality food products. In 2007, the Quesada Gardens Initiative led a project of the Southeast Sector Food Access Working Group (SEFA) to survey 562 residents about the food options in their neighborhood.  Ninety-four percent said they would “actively support new food options,” 58 percent said they wanted a co-op market and 53 percent said it was “important” to have foods free of pesticides and chemicals.

Mark Ghaly, SEFA Co-Chair and Southeast Health Center Director, said, “This survey makes clear how urgent it is that we find a way to provide Bayview-Hunters Point residents with convenient access to the same kinds of healthful foods available in any other San Francisco neighborhood. The disproportionate number of people here struggling with obesity, asthma, heart disease and other health issues demands that we do better.”

Kitchen Table Talks organizers request a $10 donation to go towards administrative costs. However, no one will be turned away for lack of funds. Sustainable, local refreshments will be provided, courtesy of Bi-Rite Market. Space is limited; to reserve your seat, please email ktt@civileats.com or leave a message at 925.785.0713.

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Layla Azimi worked as the Communication Coordinator for Slow Food Nation, the first event of its kind, which drew 85,000 people to San Francisco in hopes of building a healthier, more sustainable food system. Co-founder of Kitchen Table Talks, she lives in Napa Valley where she is learning to perfect her marmalade and jam-making skills and planting her first vegetable garden. Read more >

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