What to Eat: A Revolutionary Act, with Jessica Prentice | Civil Eats

What to Eat: A Revolutionary Act, with Jessica Prentice

Kitchen Table Talks announces its second installment of its new conversation series about the American food system. What to Eat: A Revolutionary Act led by local food activist and author Jessica Prentice, will be held on Tuesday, June 23 from 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. at the architecture offices of Sagan-Piechota in San Francisco. Prentice, a professional chef, is the co-creator of the Local Foods Wheel and coined the term “locavore,” which was named the 2007 New Oxford American Dictionary Word of the Year. Most recently, she joined four business partners in founding Three Stone Hearth, a Community-Supported Kitchen in Berkeley that uses local, sustainable ingredients to prepare nutrient-dense, traditional foods on a community scale.

In conjunction, Kitchen Table Talks will show a clip from Edible City, a feature-length documentary about the Bay Area food movement which focus on the stories of farmers, cooks, activists and educators who are helping to grow a local revolution around food. Prentice is featured in the film.

Kitchen Table Talks is a joint venture of Civil Eats and 18 Reasons, a non-for-profit which promotes conversation between its San Francisco Mission neighborhood and people who feed us. It is hosted by Sagan-Piechota which created Linden Tree in this same space. The purpose of Kitchen Table Talks is to build a coalition of stakeholders from all segments of society who come together to develop relationships, exchange knowledge and ideas and leave with specific actions they can implement to make meaningful improvements in our food system.  At each meeting, participants are introduced to a different non-profit organization that focuses on one facet of the sustainable food system. The presentation is followed by an open forum, allowing guests to ask the presenter questions and discuss recent food news, pending legislation and opportunities to get active in the sustainable food community.

Last month, at the inaugural Kitchen Table Talks, Food & Water Watch researcher and analyst Elanor Starmer presented a discussion on the U.S. Department of Agriculture. For a summary of Starmer’s presentation, please click here.

Space is limited. Please RSVP to ktt@civileats.com or leave a message at 925.785.0713. $10 suggested donation at the door; no one will be turned away for lack of funds. A portion of the evening’s proceeds will be donated to Edible City. Sustainable food and refreshments will be provided, courtesy of Bi-Rite Market. For those who cannot attend, a summary of the evening’s discussion will be found on this site.

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Layla Azimi worked as the Communication Coordinator for Slow Food Nation, the first event of its kind, which drew 85,000 people to San Francisco in hopes of building a healthier, more sustainable food system. Co-founder of Kitchen Table Talks, she lives in Napa Valley where she is learning to perfect her marmalade and jam-making skills and planting her first vegetable garden. Read more >

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  1. is there a place we can watch these talks online?
  2. Layla Azimi
    Stephanie- this particular session will be available online and will be posted within a few days of the presentation. In the near future, we hope to have all the sessions available to view online. Thank you!
  3. Awesome! thank you!

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