Sustainable Ag Chat on Twitter: The Culture of Food, Sun 5/31 8pm ET | Civil Eats

Sustainable Ag Chat on Twitter: The Culture of Food, Sun 5/31 8pm ET

Sustainable Agriculture Chat (#sustagchat) is back after a break for Memorial Day weekend, and ready to discuss the upcoming films (Food, Inc., FRESH, etc), the new television series by Mike Judge poking fun at greenies The Goode Family, and our first Supreme Court Nominee interested in talking about food — Sonya Sotomayor, in a 1 1/2 hour discussion beginning this Sunday the 31st at 8pm ET. We hope you can come out! All are welcome to join the chat, just please announce yourself at the beginning by telling everyone your name and affiliations, and use the #sustagchat tag on your tweets in order to create a searchable dialog. You are welcome to send questions and comments to our moderator, @sustagchat.

Moderating this week will be Meredith Modzelewski (@meredithmo). Here is some more info about her:

Meredith Modzelewski, a former corporate healthcare & pharmaceutical public relations professional, said “no thanks” to all that a year ago. Now, a self-styled gastronome, she communicates and advocates toward a safe, healthy, and sustainable food system. Modzelewski is into sustainable agriculture, local food, permaculture, and slow you-name-it: she currently helps organize a CSA and is working to get a new food co-op off the ground in her neighborhood in Brooklyn, NY.

Here’s some food for thought for the chat —

Q1. Food is a very important part of popular culture. Are the ways food is discussed, presented and used in popular culture changing? Or, how would you like to see it change?

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Q2. Did you watch The Goode Family last week? Was it funny or did you find it more of a mockery? How do we feel about the way food issues are being covered in popular media? Are there important issues that you think are not getting covered?

Q3. Food, Inc. begins with a ride through a grocery store, and explores the kinds of imagery on the various products there. How do images of nostalgia help or hurt the sustainable movement?

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Of course, these are just to get you started! See you Sunday.

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Paula Crossfield is a founder and the Editor-at-large of Civil Eats. She is also a co-founder of the Food & Environment Reporting Network. Her reporting has been featured in The Nation, Gastronomica, Index Magazine, The New York Times and more, and she has been a contributing producer at The Leonard Lopate Show on New York Public Radio. An avid cook and gardener, she currently lives in Oakland. Read more >

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