"Ripe Food" Movement Takes Hold in Berkeley | Civil Eats

“Ripe Food” Movement Takes Hold in Berkeley

In a groundbreaking review by Cassie Harwood, “From the Compost Bin to the Dinner Table: Second Life Cafe leads the way in the “ripe food” movement.,” she describes what can only be described as the next wave of responsible eating.

According to Harwood:

“Second Life, a lunch and dinner restaurant that opened in March, caters to the quickly bourgeoning “ripe food” movement. Unlike raw food, which has seen a spike in popularity in recent years and is heralded for its fresh, uncooked status, ripe food has the distinction of being recycled — or, to be more accurate, composted.”

This seems like the most sustainable idea I’ve heard all day.

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Chef / Ecologist Aaron French is the Environment Editor at Civil Eats. He is the chef of The Sunny Side Cafe and is writing his first book "The Bay Area Homegrown Cookbook" (Voyageur Press, 2011). He has a Masters in Ecology and is currently working toward his MBA at UC Berkeley, with a focus on sustainable business practices. Read more >

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  1. I like the idea of food having been composted. Maybe it's something that will catch on within the raw food movement too!

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