Getting Seedy | Civil Eats

Getting Seedy

gettle

The last couple sunny days have gotten me itching to buy seeds.  The skilled gardeners I know (of which I am decidedly not, having barely grown an herb garden that now looks like brittle sticks in dirt) have told me to get started with my highlighter and my catalogs – order before it gets to late and the best seeds are gone.  So I became a member of the Hudson Valley Seed Library ($20) and got ten complimentary packets of their heirlooms, most of which come from this area.

With Monsanto and their ilk gobbling up all the seed companies in the last decade, its important to remember to support the little guys – like another small company in Missouri, Baker Creek Seed Company.

From The People Who Feed Us:

At sixteen years of age, Jere Gettle joined Seed Savers Exchange and never
looked back. With his interest in gardening (and collecting) as the catalyst, he
started Baker Creek Seed Company And he still looking for ways to get the
word out about the value of heirloom seeds.

Now his operation distributes nearly 100,000 catalogs yearly, hosts a gardening
forum-I Dig My Garden, and has put together what is generally acknowledged as
one of the best seed collections around.

Jere gives a good explanation here of why heirlooms matter. The diversity of
plants is a strength that Baker Creek promotes mightily. As host to several events
at his southwestern Missouri location every year, Jere is a outspoken advocate
for real food through old-school seeds. He loves this stuff.

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Check out the engaging documentary they made of Jere Gettle (and the many other wonderful documentaries on their site, www.thepeoplewhofeedus.com)

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Paula Crossfield is a founder and the Editor-at-large of Civil Eats. She is also a co-founder of the Food & Environment Reporting Network. Her reporting has been featured in The Nation, Gastronomica, Index Magazine, The New York Times and more, and she has been a contributing producer at The Leonard Lopate Show on New York Public Radio. An avid cook and gardener, she currently lives in Oakland. Read more >

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  1. I made my big seed order from them this year. The Dervae family in Pasadena just launched Freedom Seeds this year as well trying to save seeds from Monsanto.
  2. Paula,

    Thanks so much for including our local seed company in your post. The Seed Savers Exchange, the national organization which Jere mentions, remains one of our biggest inspirations. I also believe that along with keeping heirloom seeds and their stories alive, we need to spread seed-saving skills. We give talks on seed-saving and run hands-on workshops in upstate NY and NYC during the growing season. Enjoy growing our little seeds- if you have questions feel free to email me! Sow local!
    • pcrossfield
      Thanks, Ken, for visiting Civil Eats! I'm looking forward to *attempting* to grow your seeds on my rooftop!! I'm so excited to support the seed-saving community any way I can.

      Best, Paula

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