Community Eat-In in the Victory Garden | Civil Eats

Community Eat-In in the Victory Garden

This Saturday, November 22 at noon, San Francisco Bay Area residents will gather for an Eat-In at the Slow Food Nation Victory Garden in front of San Francisco City Hall. An Eat-In is a group of people gathering in a public space in order to share a meal. This Eat-In serves to bring local residents together to discuss how we ensure that everyone has access to good, clean and fair food. It is free of cost and open to the first 200 who register at http://slowfoodnation.org/get-involved/community-days-in-the-victory-garden/

Organizers are providing tables and chairs. The meal is a potluck. Participants bring their own plates, cups and silverware and home-cooked food to share. Before the meal, activists and advocates from Quesada Gardens, La Cocina, Glide Memorial Church, Nextcourse, the San Francisco Food Bank, the California Food and Justice Coalition, the St. Anthony Foundation and Project Homeless Connect will highlight programs that are improving our local food system. This event marks the last day the Victory Garden is open before volunteers begin a two-week project to dismantle it. Materials from the garden are being donated to Project Homeless Connect to help them build an edible urban garden.  The final harvest will be donated to the San Francisco Food Bank.

If you’re in the Bay Area and would like to attend the Eat-In, please reserve a seat.

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Gordon Jenkins is the Time for Lunch Campaign Coordinator at Slow Food USA. He is the Director of Eat-Ins.org and was an organizer for Slow Food Nation 2008. He has served as an assistant to Alice Waters and as a student farmer and writer for the Yale Sustainable Food Project. Read more >

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