New York Magazine Proposes Locavore Thanksgiving Menu | Civil Eats

New York Magazine Proposes Locavore Thanksgiving Menu

In this week’s issue of New York Magazine, New York-based chefs and farmers worked together to bring readers a locally grown Thanksgiving menu complete with recipes. Here is how the magazine introduced their spread:

“The Pilgrims, of course, were locavores, and now, after decades of factory farming and MSG, we’ve come full circle. Eating minimally processed food from nearby sources has become a New York, and national, obsession. In that spirit, we’ve assembled “A Local Thanksgiving”—a complete holiday feast, created by the most ingredients-driven New York chefs and sourced from area farmers. Yes, you may pay a bit more, but what you lose in parsimony you gain in ecological correctness and, most important, deliciousness. Besides, here’s something else the Pilgrims understood: Even in a world of tight resources, there are occasions when a small splurge is exactly what one needs.”

I’m considering celebrating Thanksgiving with an Eat-in, where we will eat locally sourced food, and then send everyone on their way with a biodegradable doggie bag.

How are you celebrating Thanksgiving? Are there any recipes from your neck of the woods that involve using local ingredients? Will you be using Thanksgiving as an opportunity to encourage a change in the food system?

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Photo: Farmer Ken Migliorelli and Dan Barber’s fennel soup by Marcus Nilsson for New York Magazine

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Paula Crossfield is a founder and the Editor-at-large of Civil Eats. She is also a co-founder of the Food & Environment Reporting Network. Her reporting has been featured in The Nation, Gastronomica, Index Magazine, The New York Times and more, and she has been a contributing producer at The Leonard Lopate Show on New York Public Radio. An avid cook and gardener, she currently lives in Oakland. Read more >

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  1. I'm not certain what I'm doing for Thanksgiving, but it will definitely involve local food. I love all the goodies that the late fall harvest offers and I can't wait to cook it up and eat it, be it alone or with some friends!
    An Eat-in sounds great.
  2. Any suggestions for the San Francisco Bay Area?

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