Tonight! Slow Food Nation Considered, UC Berkeley, 7pm | Civil Eats

Tonight! Slow Food Nation Considered, UC Berkeley, 7pm

On the heels of last weekend’s successful Slow Food Nation event in San Francisco, participants will discuss where the Slow Food Movement should go from here, especially with regard to the world food crisis. This panel will feature food activist and Vice President of Slow Food International Dr. Vandana Shiva, author and Knight Professor of Journalism Michael Pollan, author and scholar Dr. Raj Patel, and farmer and scholar Dr. Frederick Kirschenmann, moderated by author and Professor of Geography Richard Walker.

September 3, 2008, 7pm, Wheeler Auditorium at UC Berkeley

Tickets: Tickets are available to the public for $10 at 510.642.9988, tickets.berkeley.edu, at the Ticket Office, which is located at the northeast corner of Zellerbach Hall on the UC Berkeley campus.

For more information: http://journalism.berkeley.edu/events/details.php?ID=529

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Sarah Rich is an editor at Dwell magazine, where she specializes in sustainable design and architecture. She was the managing editor of the Slow Food Nation blog leading up to the inaugural 2008 event in San Francisco. She was also the managing editor and co-author of the book Worldchanging: A User's Guide for the 21st Century (Abrams, 2006). Sarah lives in the Mission district of San Francisco where fog is scarce and tacos are not. Read more >

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  1. anonymouse
    Well, maybe the place to go from here would be to figure out what went wrong with the event at Fort Mason!
  2. Diane Campion
    I am enthused that the panel is discussing in a public forum where we should go after Slow Food Nation.If I lived in the area, I would surely be in attendance.
    Attending Slow Food Nation, was a life changing week for me. Because I attended alone, I was able to join with and meet many different people and groups. All the urban garden project directors, CUESA, and people from different ag groups that I had wanted to meet, just happened to be seated next to me, in seminars and in the lounges. All were helpful and we have established an email connection to share information.
    Next year, I hope to bring several people with me to harvest more information and build more relationships.
    MY MAIN WISH-----to have a panel- with the people listed above---come to different sections of the country with their message. Have this happen during local growing season, so it could be connected with a LOCAL farmers market, alternative energy symposium and a panel of local experts that could discuss local issues with the public and the panel. Advertise this event properly.
    I live in South Florida and my area faces unique and dire threats to its greenspaces and small farms. The good part is--the populace is starting to wake up.
  3. I'm impressed by the panels that were at Slow Food Nation and this one that is meeting tonight. However, instead of wishing that they could come to every town, I wish that SLOW FOOD USA had made more of an effort to webcast or podcast these panels in such a fashion that co-producers all over the Nation could be involved in the discussions.

    At a minimum, I wish that the programs themselves were broadcast in real time so the wave could be given some momentum.

    If you know what I mean...

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