Victory Garden Watch: Day 5 | Civil Eats

Victory Garden Watch: Day 5

Sunday brought beautiful weather to Civic Center Plaza for the 13 amazing volunteers who spent their days off moving piles of chocolate-cake soil into the circular raised beds that make up the design of the Slow Food Nation Victory Garden.

A huge thanks goes out to Holly Valerio, Derrick Williamson, Oliviana Zakaria, Besha Grey, Tamar Peltz, Noah Balmer, Jessica Cunningham, Lorelei Lamberton, Heather Smith, Mari Wallace, Claire Heitkamp, Johanna Walsh and Otis Lerer who joined John Bela and Luke Hass to shovel, rake and prepare the beds to be planted on July 12.

The 150 cubic yards of organic soil, generously donated by Lyngso Garden Materials, mixed with the Earth Saver rice straw wattle, being used to create the round beds, and together they created an earthy-sweet scent in the air.

According to their web site, Earth Saver rice straw wattles are made from recycled, naturally weed-free California rice straw. The wattles imitate natural stabilization by reducing rate of flow, absorbing water and filtering sediment runoff. The wattles also form a durable containment area to prevent polluted runoff from reaching surface waters.

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Tourists and locals alike streamed by, shouting words of encouragement, asking questions and generally drawn to the hive of activity and excitement. There seemed to be a great sense of possibility in the air as the teams worked, the summer sun bouncing off of City Hall’s gleaming dome.

It will be critical this week for more volunteers to join our efforts in order to make our Friday, July 11 deadline. If you’re interested in volunteering this week, between 9 am and 4 pm, please contact us at info@slowfoodnation.org with “Victory Garden” in the subject line. Thanks goes also to Google Café for providing delicious sandwiches for our volunteers all week long!

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Photos by Naomi Starkman

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Naomi Starkman is the founder and editor-in-chief of Civil Eats. She was a 2016 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford and co-founded the Food & Environment Reporting Network. Naomi has worked as a media consultant at Newsweek, The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, GQ, WIRED, and Consumer Reports magazines. After graduating from law school, she served as the Deputy Executive Director of the City of San Francisco’s Ethics Commission. Naomi is an avid organic gardener, having worked on several farms.  Read more >

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