Kulintang and the Filipino Community at Slow Food Nation | Civil Eats

Kulintang and the Filipino Community at Slow Food Nation

The Agrarian Arts program at Slow Food Nation engages diverse cultural groups in the Bay Area to celebrate traditional and emerging cultural practices around food and agriculture. Among the participants are members of the regional Filipino community.

During the 1920s and ’30s, Filipino immigrants in California worked as laborers harvesting asparagus and fruit. After 1965, Filipinos became one of the fastest growing immigrant groups and many of them moved from farming to professional and service occupations. In this process of growth and assimilation, the Filipino community—as is true with many immigrant populations—has struggled to preserve their native traditions.

Filipinos have a rich culinary history that includes indigenous ingredients and influences from Southeast Asia, Mexico, Spain, China, and the United States. The complexity of Filipino cuisine comes from generations of trade and immigration, colonization, religious integration, and social transformation.

As part of Slow Food Nation’s Labor Day events, the Agrarian Arts program will host a performance by the Kulintang Dance Theatre, a Bay Area-based company dedicated to performing and recovering musical traditions from the Southern Philippines.

Kulintang is popular traditional music and dance originally from the Maguindanao, Maranao, and Tausug peoples of Mindanao Island. The function of Kulintang music in the community is to provide social entertainment. Some families play it at home after dinner as part as their daily routine, or for visiting friends and relatives. Kulintang is also performed during large feasts, harvest festivals and significant life ceremonies such as baptisms and weddings.

We’ll bring the news to you.

Get the weekly Civil Eats newsletter, delivered to your inbox.

Look for the Kulintang Dance Theatre at the Soap Box in Civic Center plaza. Other performances will be announced in the upcoming weeks.

Photo courtesy of National Parks Service

Today’s food system is complex.

Invest in nonprofit journalism that tells the whole story.

Lena Zuniga is the Agrarian Arts Coordinator for Slow Food Nation. She has previously worked designing and facilitating knowledge sharing processes and the use of new media for a variety of multicultural groups and non-profit organizations, especially within the social economy movement in Latin America. Read more >

Like the story?
Join the conversation.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

More from

General

Featured

Popular

22 Solutions-Focused Stories on the Food System in 2022

Abby Barrows pulling up one of her experimental oyster bags made of metal and wood at Long Cove Sea Farm. (Photo credit: Greta Rybus)

Op-ed: Farmworkers Face Stress and Depression. The Pandemic Made It Worse.

Migrant farm laborers have their temperature checked in King City, California. (Photo credit: Brent Stirton, Getty Images)

Black Farmers in Arkansas Still Seek Justice a Century After the Elaine Massacre

Eugene

Meet the Group That’s Been Bringing Bison Back to Tribal Lands for 30 Years

The Fort Belknap Indian Reservation in Harlem, Montana, has gathered an estimated 45 buffalo during two ITBC transfers in 1996 and 2014. (Photo courtesy of the InterTribal Buffalo Council)