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Leticia Zavala (left) gives a speech in an effort to unseat the Farm Labor Organizing Committee's current and only president Baldemar Velasquez (right). (Photo credit: Grey Moran)

A Contested Election Is Fracturing a Farmworkers’ Union

Baldemar Velasquez has presided over the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, the nation’s second-largest farmworker union, for its entire 55-year history. This year, he faced a challenger in a contested election for the first time. Chaos ensued.

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A USPS postal worker leaves the line at the CoPO pantry. The price of fuel oil increased by 43.6 percent over the past 12 months, while food rose 7.9 percent. As the war drags on in Ukraine, prices for food are expected to continue to rapidly climb.

Our Best Food Access Reporting of 2022

Rising inflation is colliding with the end of some pandemic-era programs that helped people in need. As food insecurity rises, we reported on some of the most promising solutions aimed at providing access to healthy food. 

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Farming

Catholics celebrate Ash Wednesday during a mass at Holy Name Cathedral on March 1, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Catholics Used to Forgo Meat on Fridays. Could Bringing the Practice Back Help the Climate?

A recent study shows giving up meat once a week could cut thousands of tons of carbon emissions each year. While Pope Francis has called urgent climate action a moral imperative, U.S. Catholic bishops are unlikely to encourage the move.

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Civil Eats TV: Women Brewing Change at Sequoia Sake

Of the three female craft sake brewers in the U.S., two make up the mother-daughter team at Sequoia Sake in San Francisco. Working with California rice farmers, they’re bringing the nearly 2,000-year-old national drink of Japan to more Americans.

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Climate Coverage

Ann Tenakhongva, 62, and her husband, Clark Tenakhongva, 65, sort traditional Hopi Corn at their home on First Mesa on the Hopi Reservation in Arizona on September 28, 2022. The corn comes from the families’ field in the valley between First Mesa and Second Mesa, which Clark had just harvested. The corn is organized on racks to dry out and then stored in cans and bins for years to come. Much of the corn is ground up for food and ceremonial purposes. Corn is an integral part of Hopi culture and spirituality. (Photo by David Wallace)

Climate-Driven Drought Is Stressing the Hopi Tribe’s Foods and Traditions

Most Hopi grow corn with only the precipitation that falls on their fields, but two decades of drought have some of them testing the waters of irrigation and hoping they can preserve other customs with their harvests.