Civil Eats - Promoting Critical Thought About Sustainable Agriculture And Food Systems
screenshots of an instagram reel of a dorm-room cooking event of coconut tofu curry

We Are in the Golden Age of Dorm-Room Cooking

TikTok and Instagram have opened up a new world of possibilities for dorm-cooked meals.

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Walanthropy

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Walmart Heirs Bet Big on Journalism

A wash of Walton family funding to news media is creating echo chambers in environmental journalism, and beyond. Are editorial firewalls up to the task?

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Investigations

a farmer walks in a cornfield early in the season; superimposed over the picture is the text of the Iowa bill that would prevent anyone from suing chemical companies over harms from pesticides

Inside Bayer’s State-by-State Efforts to Stop Pesticide Lawsuits

As the agrichemical giant lays groundwork to fend off Roundup litigation, its use of a playbook for building influence in farm state legislatures has the potential to benefit pesticide companies nationwide.

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Injured and Invisible

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Congress Likely to Preserve OSHA Loophole That Endangers Animal Ag Workers

A 2022 Civil Eats investigation found that a budget rider that prohibits OSHA from spending money to ​regulate small farms leaves most animal-ag operations without oversight. Lawmakers appear poised to renew the rider once again.

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Civil Eats TV

Civil Eats TV: Women Brewing Change at Sequoia Sake

Of the three female craft sake brewers in the U.S., two make up the mother-daughter team at Sequoia Sake in San Francisco. Working with California rice farmers, they’re bringing the nearly 2,000-year-old national drink of Japan to more Americans.

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