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Kelsey Keener feeds chickens at Sequatchie Cove Farm. (Photo credit: Sarah Unger)

How Tennessee Officials Lost Out on Millions in Funding for Farmers and Food Banks

The Tennessee Department of Agriculture missed a USDA grant deadline to allow food banks to buy from local farmers. Now, the state is looking for ways to make up the funds.

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Walanthropy

old newspapers paired with rolls of dollar bills to convey the idea of money being invested in journalism

Walmart Heirs Bet Big on Journalism

A wash of Walton family funding to news media is creating echo chambers in environmental journalism, and beyond. Are editorial firewalls up to the task?

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Investigations

Injured divers work on various exercises in a small rehabilitation room at the hospital. Dr. Henzel Roberto Pérez, the deputy director of information management at the hospital, said that one of the many problems with the lobster diving industry is “Children are working for these companies. At least one of the companies is from the United States.” (Photo credit: Jacky Muniello)

The Year in Civil Eats Investigations, 2023

From following up on last year’s investigations into animal-ag worker protections and water rights in the West to launching a new series examining Walmart’s outsized influence over the American food system, our reporters dug deep in 2023. 

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The Farm Bill

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Injured and Invisible

Today’s food system is complex.

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Farming

Civil Eats TV

Civil Eats TV: Women Brewing Change at Sequoia Sake

Of the three female craft sake brewers in the U.S., two make up the mother-daughter team at Sequoia Sake in San Francisco. Working with California rice farmers, they’re bringing the nearly 2,000-year-old national drink of Japan to more Americans.

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