7 Powerful Ways Students are Fighting for Food Justice this Spring

NEU Real Food

Last week, The Daily Meal published their list of the “50 most powerful people in Food for 2014.” Who made the list?

Hugh Grant, CEO of Monsanto
Indra Nooyi, CEO of Pepsi
Doug McMillion, CEO of Walmart
…and it goes on.

Really?!  Here at Real Food Challenge, we know that real power lie in people’s movements for change.  Who are these powerful changemakers?  Here is our list:  Read More

In Memory of John Kinsman

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John Kinsman, a dairy farmer and loving husband and father from the hilly Driftless region of Wisconsin was an unlikely and unassuming giant in the global struggle for justice and food sovereignty. But a giant he was, touching the lives of countless people around the world in his 87 years of farming, protesting, strategizing and building relationships and solidarity. John died peacefully Monday at 87, on Martin Luther King, Jr., Day, surrounded by family on his farm. Read More

EcoFarm: 34 Years of Bringing the Organic Farming Community Together

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Thirty-four years ago the very first EcoFarm conference took place in Winters, CA. It was called “To Husband, The Earth” and was the brainchild of Amigo Bob Cantisano. At the time, he was running the only organic farm supply company and thought it would be valuable to create an event for farmer friends to gather. So he sent out a mailing and 45 people showed up for a big potluck. Read More

How Will the TPP Affect the Food System?

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If you’re like me, you’ve known for a while that the U.S. is negotiating a new trade deal called the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), but you haven’t taken the time to figure out exactly why it matters. Hey, I don’t blame us—there’s a reason it’s hard to understand: The corporations and governments negotiating the deal don’t want our opinions slowing down their shiny new free-trade agreement. Read More

Labor Takes Historic Stride Forward as Walmart Joins Fair Food Program

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The struggle for labor justice in the fields of the United States—and perhaps far beyond—took an historic stride forward yesterday. At a folding table in a metal-clad produce packing shed beside a tomato field in southwestern Florida, two high-ranking executives from the giant retailer Walmart, which sells more groceries than any other company in the world, sat down beside two Mexican farmworkers and signed an agreement to join the Fair Food Program. Read More