What Does “Artisanal” Mean, Anyway?

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Last December, the New York Times offered a list of words for the dumpster, tired and worn-out terms ready for retirement in 2014. Topping the list was “artisan,” a term used in the marketing of products ranging from small-batch pickles and preserves to Tostitos tortilla chips and Starbucks sandwiches.

Regardless of mainstream attempts to co-opt the label, a truly artisanal food movement—based in craft, community, tradition, and innovation—is alive and kicking. For these businesses, growth is not something to take lightly; it’s a delicate dance between staying true to one’s values while adapting to new economies of scale. Read More

On the Verge of a New Food and Farm Bill

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After two years and two failed attempts, Congress is on the verge of passing a new (food and) farm bill. The farm bill ultimately is a food bill, and must be concerned with truly supporting those who produce our food, those who eat it, and the land it’s produced on. While the final compromise is not quite as bad as it could’ve been, it will instead be devastating to hundreds of thousands of America’s neediest families and much better for corporations than for independent farmers, the environment or public health. Read More

GRACE’s New 9-Tip Guide to Food, Water and Energy at Home

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Many of the folks who work at GRACE have a pizza obsession. Read just a few pages into their new guide, Meet the Nexus, How Food, Water and Energy are Connected, and there it is, a full-page photo of a plain slice from one of their favorite local pizza joints. In their defense, they’re fixated less on deliciousness and more on all the resources it took to get that slice into our hands. Industrial agriculture, fossil fuels and water (42 gallons per slice, for those counting) all had a big role in making our pizza a reality. The point is that ordinary, everyday decisions (plain or pepperoni?) each have profound effects on how food, water and energy resources interact with each other. Read More

7 Powerful Ways Students are Fighting for Food Justice this Spring

NEU Real Food

Last week, The Daily Meal published their list of the “50 most powerful people in Food for 2014.” Who made the list?

Hugh Grant, CEO of Monsanto
Indra Nooyi, CEO of Pepsi
Doug McMillion, CEO of Walmart
…and it goes on.

Really?!  Here at Real Food Challenge, we know that real power lie in people’s movements for change.  Who are these powerful changemakers?  Here is our list:  Read More