All the News That’s Fit to Eat: ‘The Sugar Papers’, a Sardine Crash, and Prison-to-Table

Sardines, an important species at the center of the ocean food web, have seen a rapid decline on the West Coast.

There’s a lot of food news out there; here are some of the stories that caught our eye this week.

1. ‘Sugar Papers’ Show Industry’s Influence in 1970s Dental Program, Study Says (The California Report)

Hundreds of pages of newly-found documents show that the sugar industry worked closely with the federal government in the late 1960s and early 1970s to determine a research agenda to prevent cavities in children. Read More

In Nebraska, a Battle Over Corporate Pork Ownership

031015_hogs_sow

A proposed change to livestock rules has put Nebraska hog farmers at the center of a debate that gets to the very core of what it means to be a farmer today.

In the top pork producing states like Iowa, Minnesota and North Carolina, many farmers are under contract with giant meatpackers like Tyson or Smithfield Foods – the companies actually own the pigs and pay the farmers to raise them. That arrangement is illegal in Nebraska. Read More

Congressman Tim Ryan Wants to Start a Food Revolution

1_Ryan Real_Food_Revolution_combo_noseal

When it comes to changing the food system, Tim Ryan (D-Ohio) might be the most outspoken member of Congress yet. Now in his sixth term, Ryan is the author of Real Food Revolution, Healthy Eating, Green Groceries, and the Return of the American Family Farm. Former President Bill Clinton describes the book as “a straightforward and much-needed prescription to help transform our country’s food systems and improve our well-being.” Read More

A (70s) Macrobiotic Cooking School is Brought Up to Date

NGI - Public Class

When people talk to Anthony Fassio about his new role as CEO at Manhattan’s Natural Gourmet Institute (NGI), he tends to field the same question:Isn’t that the vegan school?”

A few years back, that might have been closer to the case. Although NGI didn’t traditionally offer a vegan cooking education, but rather one focused on macrobiotic food, which espouses grains, local vegetables, and limited animal products. Read More

Welcome Anna Roth, Civil Eats’ New Senior Editor

annaroth_headshot2

When we announced that we were looking for a new editor, we were blown away by the caliber of applicants. If we had the budget of a mainstream publication, we could hire so many amazing writers and really build the Civil Eats empire. Until then, we’ve just added one more stellar member to our team: Anna Roth, SF Weekly’s former food & drink editor, who joins us as our new senior editor. Read More

This Crop of Women Farmers is Stepping Up to Sustain the Land

LindseyGrassrootsFarm.jpg.pagespeed.ce.BrfaK5RKmg
Last year, all five of the first-year apprentices at Soil Born Farms’ headquarters near Sacramento, California were women. Another young woman, Elle Huftill-Balzer, was the boss of them all, the farm manager.

“It [was] a total girl-power year around here,” says Janet Whalen Zeller, co-founder and co-director of Soil Born Farms Urban Agriculture and Education Project, which oversees two farms totaling 56 acres. In fact, during the past few years the majority of apprenticeship applicants at the farm have been women.
Read More

As GOP Candidates Gather in Iowa, Two Visions of Farming Clash

foodagsummit

With its millions of acres of farmland, Iowa is a crucial part of our country’s food landscape. Almost a third of all pork sold in the United States is raised in Iowa, along with two billion bushels of corn, half a billion bushels of soybeans, and 13.8 billion eggs. The majority of this food isn’t produced by independent family farmers, but rather on large-scale commercial farms and in a growing number of concentrated animal feeding operations or CAFOs. Read More