Low-Fat vs. Low-Carb: The Winner is Neither

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Welcome to round 3,752 of the Diet Wars. This week’s opponents have been battling it out for decades, each with hordes of devoted fans. In one corner: carbohydrates. In the other: fat. Both have taken their share of punches throughout the years, and they are back for more following the release of a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

A much-cited New York Times article on the study titled “A Call For a Low-Carb Diet” reads: “People who avoid carbohydrates and eat more fat, even saturated fat, lose more body fat and have fewer cardiovascular risks than people who follow the low-fat diet that health authorities have favored for decades.” Read More

What a Difference a Cage Makes: California’s Humane Egg Battle

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Update: The 6-state lawsuit mentioned in this piece has since been thrown out by a U.S. District judge.

 

Ed Olivera is making a sizable investment in his San Jose, California-based egg operation this year. And just in time. He and other egg producers in the state now have less than four months to meet new, more humane standards for laying hens set to go into effect on January 1, 2015.

Olivera is “taking out partitions,” between the battery cages many of his laying hens live in, making the remaining cages larger. He’s also putting in a brand new building filled with an “enriched colony system,” or enriched cages, which will house 200,000 hens. Cal-Maine Egg Farm InvestigationThe standard battery cage is only 67 square inches (see the photo to the right), and has a footprint smaller than a letter-sized piece of paper, but the new cages hold more birds and allow around twice as much space (116 square inches) per bird. Now the legal standard for all laying hens in Europe, enriched cages are still a new concept in the U.S. (See an example from the EU below.) Read More

5 Reasons the Tyson-Hillshire Buyout is a Big [Meat] Deal

Photo by Capital Area Food Bank of Texas.

Although it has been in the works for months, the merger of Tyson Foods and Hillshire Brands went public the week before Labor Day, when the U.S. Justice Department approved the deal. The merger brings together the largest meat processing company in the U.S. (Tyson) and the 11th largest (Hillshire), for $7.7 billion. And even if you buy mainly sustainable and grassfed meat, this merger is worth watching. Read More

Local Food By Boat: The Vermont Sail Freight Project

The Vermont Sail Freight Project stops in Kingston, NY. Photo by Jim Peppler

Maritime museums are nostalgic places full of black and white photographs of old sails and rugged seafarers. Ornate boats hint at centuries of technological progress and suggest that craftsmanship has suffered as a result. But the old became new again recently at the Hudson Maritime Museum in New York, when a sailboat arrived to sell agricultural goods from upriver. Visitors caught a glimpse of a river-based local food economy—a vestige of the past and a harbinger of an alternative future. Read More

More Crops Per Drop: No-Till Farming Combats Drought

Soil that is left un-tilled stays cooler and retains more moisture. Photo courtesy of the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service

Paul and Elizabeth Kaiser of Northern California’s Singing Frogs Farm grows fruit and vegetables completely without machinery, a system Paul refers to as “non-mechanized, no-till.” He said goodbye to his tractor and tiller seven years ago after he felt he was unnecessarily harming wildlife, saw too many machines break down, and watched his soil quality decrease. Now, his eight-acre farm has a robust community supported agriculture (CSA) program, and his soil is full of life. Read More

After Mine Disaster, Alaska’s Salmon Fishermen Want Change

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Here in Alaska, salmon season is in full swing. Fishermen are working hard and celebrating a good catch that has already topped 100 million salmon. I have been fishing here for nearly two decades, beginning alongside my father on a Bristol Bay gillnetter at 17 before getting my own boat. I’m proud to be part of an industry that feeds the world with healthy, sustainably harvested wild fish. Read More