All the News That’s Fit to Eat: Rising Egg Prices, Sweet N’Low Rivers, and Sketchy Shrimp

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Catch up on this week’s food politics news with the stories that caught our eye:

For Bakers And Restaurants, Egg Supply Is Getting Ugly (NPR)

The bird flu that has plagued the Midwest for months is finally waning, but an unexpected side effect is the rising cost of eggs–in some cases, prices have more than doubled since May. Meanwhile, Hampton Creek, maker of eggless mayo and cookie dough, has become the fastest-growing food company in the world partially thanks to the bird flu’s effects. Read More

Snails: The Slowest Food of All [Audio]

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Ric Brewer got his first taste of snails by gate-crashing a high-school French club field trip to a French restaurant in Seattle. He ate the escargots on a dare but loved them — so much so that somehow, decades later, he found himself quitting his job, moving out to the Olympic Peninsula in coastal Washington, and investing everything he had to launch one of America’s only snail ranches. Read More

A Decade Later, Isa Chandra Moskowitz Is Still ‘Vegan With a Vengeance’

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You’d be hard-pressed to find a vegan who doesn’t own at least one of Isa Chandra Moskowitz’s cookbooks. Her first, Vegan with a Vengeance: Over 150 Delicious, Cheap, Animal-Free Recipes That Rock, came out 10 years ago, and since then, she’s written seven more. Her third book, Veganomicon!, is known by many as the vegan bible, and her blog, The Post Punk Kitchen, has been a resource for both novice and experienced cooks since 2003. Read More

Chefs: Please Stop Calling It ‘Trash Fish’

Black cod en cactus “paper.” Photo by Allan Zepeda.

I’m all for the spirit of the trash fish movement: getting lesser-known species that were once discarded into the hands of skillful chefs who make them shine. I just don’t like the name.

Chefs Collaborative has been hosting Trash Fish Dinners around the county since 2013 and they’ve started a trend. I was recently invited to a dinner at a vineyard in my area by chef and restaurateur Gabriela Cámara from Mexico City. The publicist told me she would be cooking with “trash fish.” The term made me wince, but I wanted to see what she could do with our local fish, as she’s opening a seafood restaurant in San Francisco this summer. Read More

Can Better Grazing Help Dairy Farmers Cope With Drought and Climate Change?

Photo courtesy of Organic Valley

Jon Bansen has been working on a dairy farm in Monmouth, Oregon alongside his father for nearly 30 years. When the farm switched to organic about 16 years ago, he started to pay more attention to their 650 acres of grass and forageland. Grazing has long been central to organic dairies, and since 2010 the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has required that organic dairy cows spend at least 120 days out of the year eating grass on pasture, rather than grain-based feed. Read More

All the News That’s Fit to Eat: Ag-Gag Bill Passes, FDA’s New Rules on Antibiotics, Young Farmer Loan Forgiveness

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Get caught up with us on this week’s food news. Here’s what caught our eye:

Lawmakers Override McCrory Veto on Controversial ‘Ag-Gag’ Bill (WRAL)

Both the North Carolina House and Senate voted on Wednesday to override Gov. Pat McCrory’s veto of a bill that would make it illegal for employees of any business to enter unauthorized spaces or place unattended surveillance devices on the property. House Bill 405, which many are calling an “ag-gag” bill because of its implications for factory farm whistleblowing, will become law January 1, 2016. Read More