Recent Articles About School Food

‘Food Detective’ Class Gets Seattle Kids Eating Better

Two months ago, Seattle-area 4th grader Michael Kenny came home from school with a burning desire to make vegetarian chili. His mom Liz nearly fell out of her seat. She knew her son was not fond of peppers—and he’d never shown much interest in cooking before. “They sent all the students home with a recipe, and when he came home he wanted to make it right away,” Liz says. “And most of the ingredients were vegetables!” Read more

State of the Tray: Will Recent Improvements in School Food be Rolled Back?

Editor’s note: Have you had a hard time keeping up with all changes on the school lunch front these last few years? If so, you’re not alone. We asked Lunch Tray blogger Bettina Elias Siegel to give us an update on the state of the tray.

In late 2010, Congress voted to overhaul school meals. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (“HHFKA”) was championed by First Lady Michelle Obama and generally lauded by public health experts, anti-hunger groups, and food policy advocates as landmark legislation that would get America’s kids on the right track. By adding more whole grains, more fruits and vegetables, and simultaneously lowering sodium and capping overall calories on school lunch trays, the law promised much-needed change. Read more

Schools Interfere With Home-Packed Lunches–Why I’m Not Offended

A few weeks ago, the Internet was buzzing over news reports that an elementary school in Richmond, VA—allegedly in accordance with federal law–is requiring parents to obtain a doctor’s note if they want to send a home-packed lunch to school with their child. Then, this week, Dr. Yoni Freedhoff reported on his Weighty Matters blog that a Canadian mother was fined $10 under Manitoba’s Early Learning and Child Care lunch regulations for failing to include a grain product in her child’s home-packed lunch of  ”leftover homemade roast beef and potatoes, carrots, an orange and some milk.”  (The child was supplied with less-than-nutritious Ritz crackers by the school.)  Both of these stories have gone viral, if my own Facebook feed is any measure. Read more

Is Perfect the Enemy of Good? In the Food Reform World, Yes

At an August 2013 press conference, a frustrated President Obama stated, “I don’t know a law that solves a problem 100 percent.” He was referencing the painful fight over immigration reform. But food reformers should take his comment to heart. There’s no such thing as a perfect food policy or solution and those who pursue perfection are not only destined to fail, they may also unintentionally harm the cause in the process.   Read more

What Ever Happened to Michelle Obama’s School Lunch Program?

First Lady Michelle Obama received a lot of positive press when she unveiled her child health initiative, which included her “Let’s Move!” exercise campaign, the first-ever task force on child obesity and her championing of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. The legislation, which required meals in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) to have fewer calories, more fruits and vegetables, fewer processed items and less sodium, was passed by a Congressional majority. And today the school lunches that 31 million kids eat are more likely to include a whole-wheat vegetarian pizza than sloppy joes.

But in the year since the changes took effect, the meals have been under serious scrutiny. The standards have been criticized as too rigid. Read more

Marion Nestle Speaks Out on the Big Business of School Food

A year ago, when I was working as an editor at the magazine Whole Living, I oversaw a special issue on food featuring “Visionaries”—people making a real difference in the way this country thinks about eating. There was “The Motivated Mayor” (Michael Bloomberg); “The Integrator” (Harlem chef and restaurateur Marcus Samuelsson); and, among several others, there was “The Badass.”

That would be Marion Nestle. Read more