Recent Articles About Food Waste

Sam Kass Wants to Put the Climate on the Menu Before It’s Too Late

Since Sam Kass left his position as assistant White House chef and executive director of the first lady’s “Let’s Move!” campaign late last year, he has had no shortage of things to do. For one, he’s preparing to join the NBC News team as a senior food analyst. But first, Kass is planning some very important meals.

This December, 25,000 delegates from 190 nations will be meeting in Paris for the United Nation’s Conference of Parties or COP 21. The goal is to ensure every nation takes action to keep the average global temperature increase below 2 degrees centigrade by achieving a “binding and universal agreement on climate, from all the nations of the world.” Read more

Want to Waste Less Food? There’s a Book for That

Dana Gunders has been talking about food waste since before it was hot. After helping elevate the issue with a groundbreaking report in 2012, this staff scientist for the Food & Agriculture Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), recognized the lack of cohesive information for consumers about the topic. So she got to work crafting a practical, user-friendly guide to help people identify their own habits and use more of the food they buy. Read more

These Salad Greens Keep Growing on Your Kitchen Counter

Salad greens have been getting a bad wrap in the news lately. Not only are pre-cut greens notoriously risky from a food safety perspective (Since the 2006 E. coli outbreak, all bagged lettuce now gets triple washed, but a 2010 Consumer Reports study says that spinach and other greens still harbor dangerous bacteria), but they also require considerably more water and other resources than head lettuce. Worst of all: A great deal of it goes to waste. According to the Washington Post, as much as 1 billion pounds go to waste every year. Read more

Feeding Farms with Supermarket Food Waste

You don’t have to dumpster dive to know that supermarkets send a steady stream of uneaten food to landfills.

Once there, the waste does more than smell bad. It also contributes to climate change by emitting methane, a greenhouse gas that is around 30 times more potent than carbon dioxide. In fact, landfills are the third largest source of methane emissions in the U.S., according to the Environmental Protection Agency (one reason the USDA recently pledged to reduce food waste 50 percent nationally by 2030). Read more

Feeding People, Creating Jobs with Would-be Waste in Philadelphia

Imagine making thousands of dollars a month for something you’re going to throw away. Oh yeah—and you’d be helping feed hungry people.

Sound good? According to a pilot project in West Philadelphia, it’s entirely possible for grocery stores. And the folks involved are hoping that when the pope visits the City of Brotherly Love next month, they can show the world a new way to deal with the global problem of food waste. Read more

Tempest in a Green Bin

When Oakland restaurateur Gail Lillian received her July compost bill for her food truck and brick and mortar restaurant, Liba Falafel, she was shocked by the dollar figure. Lillian was expecting to see some increase in her waste disposal bill. She had received notices from the trash and recycling companies about a coming rate hike, and she remembered the contentious and controversial fight that occurred last fall over the City of Oakland’s new contract for waste hauling. But she was unprepared to get hit with such huge jump.

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Generation Yum: Why Millennials Are the Most Food-Obsessed Generation in History

Millennials are thinking more about food than any generation in history. At least that’s the thesis behind Eve Turow’s new book, A Taste of Generation Yum: How the Millennial Generation’s Love for Organic Fare, Celebrity Chefs, and Microbrews Will Make or Break the Future of Food. The 28-year-old writer spent three-and-a-half years interviewing peers, sifting through academic studies, and talking to thinkers like Anthony Bourdain and Michael Pollan to find out what about eating has obsessed her generation. Read more

Dinner by the Numbers: How Do Meal Kits Stack Up?

Putting food on the table on a busy weeknight is a universal problem. Now, a horde of new, sleek, venture capital-funded services has arrived on the market peddling what they think is a solution: kits made of raw ingredientsportioned and sometimes preppedthat can be assembled quickly to make a meal “from scratch.” Read more

Distillers Join the Fight Against Food Waste

When Moose Koons offered to buy overripe, misshapen, and undersized fruit from farmers in Palisade, Colorado, their reactions were all the same. “They thought we were nuts!” he recalls.

The tattoo-covered skateboarder-turned-distiller convinced local farmers that the peaches, pears, and apples that supermarkets didn’t want were perfect for distilling into artisan spirits. Read more