Recent Articles About Food Waste

Go Ahead, Dumpster Dive. This Guy Will Pay The Fine.

Dumpster divers of the world, unite. Last week, food waste activist Rob Greenfield offered to pay the fines and bring some media attention to anyone who gets arrested or ticketed for taking and eating tossed food.

Greenfield has been drawing attention to food waste by traveling the country, engaging local communities, and photographing the enormous quantities of wasted food he finds. Now he hopes more Americans will begin looking at the problem directly by trying it themselves by taking people’s fear of arrest and fines out of the equation. Read more

Salvage Supperclub: Feeding People, Not Landfills

A recent photo of Salvage Supperclub stopped me in my tracks. The photo showed a dozen people happily dining inside a dumpster, with the goal to draw attention to the growing issue of food waste in the U.S. Like all reasonable people with an extreme interest in food, I signed up to get an alert for the next dinner.

Salvage Supperclub is the brainchild of Josh Treuhaft, a recent graduate of the Design for Social Innovation program at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Treuhaft was a self-described “compost junkie” before he enrolled. As he tested different hypotheses, it became clear to him that “most people don’t get excited about waste. Wasting less is hard to do and it makes you feel guilty.” Read more

Uncovering America’s Food Waste Fiasco

Every year, Americans throw away $165 billion dollars worth of food—that’s more than we spend on the food stamp program (SNAP), national parks, public libraries, and health care for veterans combined. Around 40 percent of our entire food supply gets tossed in trashcans, dumpsters, and landfills, and we’re not even a well-fed nation.

Fifty million Americans, or one in seven, are food insecure and 17 million children, or one in five, go without food on a regular basis. The majority of you reading this likely don’t experience hunger or food insecurity, but the truth is we are a very hungry nation. Read more

Choices Can Slice School Food Waste

This post is part of the series Tossed Out – Food Waste in America from Harvest Public Media.

Lunch time at Harris Bilingual Elementary School in Fort Collins, Colo., displays all the usual trappings of a public school cafeteria: Star Wars lunch boxes, light up tennis shoes, hard plastic trays and chocolate milk cartons with little cartoon cows. It’s pizza day, the most popular of the week, and kids line up at a salad bar before receiving their slice.

Read more

Ex Trader Joe’s Exec Wants to Use Expired Food to Get People Cooking

If you care about food waste, odds are good that you’ve heard of the Daily Table, a new Boston-based model of grocery store that will take safe food that has been discarded or is close to expiring and sell it at prices that compete with fast food in low-income areas. It’s an important model that comes at a time when U.S. consumers, companies, and businesses throw away 165 billion dollars worth of entirely edible food each year–or 40 percent of the food we produce in this country. Read more

Food Trucks, Moving Companies Get in on Food Waste Reduction

Whether its canned goods or pantry items, most people leave food behind when they move. As one whose family ran a moving company, Adam Lowry saw pounds of food go to waste. Until one day, he had an idea.

“We figured we’d just ask people,” recalls the founder and executive director of Move for Hunger, a hunger relief organization that works with relocation. “In the first month we collected 300 pounds of food.” Read more

Online Map Helps Makes Wasted Food Visible

Jeff Emtman opens the door of his freezer and one-by-one removes the contents. He pulls out several pounds of Brussels sprouts, loaves of artisan bread, cinnamon rolls, three-plus pounds of locally made chocolate. And there’s more.

Emtman, a Seattle resident deeply concerned about food waste, acquired his bittersweet collection in dumpsters located on FallingFruit.org, a long underground source for dumpster divers or “freegans” who dine on out-dated, over-stocked or overripe food tossed out by stores, restaurants, and bakeries. Now, the map is no longer a buried treasure. Read more