Recent Articles About Food Waste

Feeding People, Creating Jobs with Would-be Waste in Philadelphia

Imagine making thousands of dollars a month for something you’re going to throw away. Oh yeah—and you’d be helping feed hungry people.

Sound good? According to a pilot project in West Philadelphia, it’s entirely possible for grocery stores. And the folks involved are hoping that when the pope visits the City of Brotherly Love next month, they can show the world a new way to deal with the global problem of food waste. Read more

Tempest in a Green Bin

When Oakland restaurateur Gail Lillian received her July compost bill for her food truck and brick and mortar restaurant, Liba Falafel, she was shocked by the dollar figure. Lillian was expecting to see some increase in her waste disposal bill. She had received notices from the trash and recycling companies about a coming rate hike, and she remembered the contentious and controversial fight that occurred last fall over the City of Oakland’s new contract for waste hauling. But she was unprepared to get hit with such huge jump.

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Generation Yum: Why Millennials Are the Most Food-Obsessed Generation in History

Millennials are thinking more about food than any generation in history. At least that’s the thesis behind Eve Turow’s new book, A Taste of Generation Yum: How the Millennial Generation’s Love for Organic Fare, Celebrity Chefs, and Microbrews Will Make or Break the Future of Food. The 28-year-old writer spent three-and-a-half years interviewing peers, sifting through academic studies, and talking to thinkers like Anthony Bourdain and Michael Pollan to find out what about eating has obsessed her generation. Read more

Dinner by the Numbers: How Do Meal Kits Stack Up?

Putting food on the table on a busy weeknight is a universal problem. Now, a horde of new, sleek, venture capital-funded services has arrived on the market peddling what they think is a solution: kits made of raw ingredientsportioned and sometimes preppedthat can be assembled quickly to make a meal “from scratch.” Read more

Distillers Join the Fight Against Food Waste

When Moose Koons offered to buy overripe, misshapen, and undersized fruit from farmers in Palisade, Colorado, their reactions were all the same. “They thought we were nuts!” he recalls.

The tattoo-covered skateboarder-turned-distiller convinced local farmers that the peaches, pears, and apples that supermarkets didn’t want were perfect for distilling into artisan spirits. Read more

Chefs: Please Stop Calling It ‘Trash Fish’

I’m all for the spirit of the trash fish movement: getting lesser-known species that were once discarded into the hands of skillful chefs who make them shine. I just don’t like the name.

Chefs Collaborative has been hosting Trash Fish Dinners around the county since 2013 and they’ve started a trend. I was recently invited to a dinner at a vineyard in my area by chef and restaurateur Gabriela Cámara from Mexico City. The publicist told me she would be cooking with “trash fish.” The term made me wince, but I wanted to see what she could do with our local fish, as she’s opening a seafood restaurant in San Francisco this summer. Read more

Did Dan Barber’s Food Waste Pop-Up Make a Difference?

For a few weeks this March, New Yorkers lined up outside a trendy Greenwich Village restaurant for a chance to pay $15 a plate for food that most would consider garbage. The event in question was wastED, the innovative and ambitious dining project from chef and author Dan Barber, who transformed his restaurant, Blue Hill, into a pop-up aimed at showing the dining world how much could be done with scraps, leftovers, and industrial byproducts.

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Would You Drink Your Latte Out of a Cup Made From Coffee?

There is a great deal of waste behind your cup of coffee. Last year, researchers at the University of Bath in the UK found that a small coffee shop throws out roughly 22 pounds of used coffee grounds per day. In January, a satirical short film called “Kill the K-Cup” went viral, projecting a dystopian future overrun by the non-biodegradable, landfill-clogging, coffee-brewing pods. And just this month, the inventor of K-Cups publicly apologized for his innovation, telling The Atlantic, “No matter what they say … those things will never be recyclable.” Read more

Can Patagonia’s New Food Line Revolutionize the Salmon Industry?

Last summer, the outerwear giant Patagonia made an unusual purchase: 80,000 pounds of wild Sockeye salmon. The fish was for its new food line, Patagonia Provisions, available online and in the company’s 30 U.S. retail stores in the form of a 6-ounce, $12 package of vacuum-packed, shelf-stable smoked salmon. If the product is successful, it could become one of the most verifiably ethical and sustainable salmon options on the market, much in the way Patagonia aimed to change the garment industry nearly two decades ago by switching to organic cotton.

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