Recent Articles About Antibiotics

Most Fast Food Restaurants Get a Failing Grade on Antibiotic Use in Meat

This spring, when McDonald’s announced its plans to start buying chicken raised without antibiotics important to human medicine, the move had a ripple effect throughout the food supply. McDonalds is the nation’s second largest chicken buyer and Tyson Foods, the largest U.S. poultry producer, and one of McDonalds’ major suppliers, followed shortly thereafter with a similar announcement. A few weeks later, the nation’s number-two poultry producer, Pilgrim’s Pride, announced its own antibiotic reduction policy. Read more

Pig Tales: New Book Tells The Story of Pork in America

Not every writer can speak to both seasoned experts and curious newcomers, but that is precisely what Barry Estabrook can do well. In his 2011 book, Tomatoland, Estabrook took a deep dive in the modern tomato industry, shining a light on labor abuse in Florida, and the work of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers. In addition to telling a riveting and complex story full of pesticides poisoning, escape from slavery, and tense court cases, Estabrook helped bring attention to one of the most important American labor struggles of the last few decades. Read more

Five Things to Consider About Tyson’s Big Antibiotics Announcement

Last week, Tyson Foods made major headlines when it announced that it was “striving to eliminate human antibiotics from broiler chicken production by September 2017.” The move garnered a great deal of accolades for one of the biggest chicken producers in the world. The National Resources Defense Council (NRDC), which has been campaigning to stop the overuse of antibiotics in farming for years, has called this “the tipping point for getting the chicken industry off antibiotics.” Read more

How McDonald’s Could Serve Up a Happier Meal

McDonald’s announced today that it’s making a greater effort at offering transparency and engagement to the public, in a new campaign it’s calling “Our Food, Your Questions.” McDonald’s has a serious image problem and a sagging bottom line, which might explain its sudden willingness to fling the barn door open as a way to shed its reputation for serving mass-produced, unhealthy food. Showing the public how the sausage is made may win favor with some consumers, but a better strategy for the fast food giant would be to make truly meaningful commitments to sustainability. Read more

All the News That’s Fit to Eat: New Poultry Rules, GMO-Resistant Bugs, and Climate-Friendly Cheerios

It’s summer, but that doesn’t mean food news stops. Below, we share some of the top news stories of the week.

1. USDA Overhauls Poultry Inspection Rules (The Hill)

After more than two years of proposals and push-back by advocates, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) moved to put new poultry inspection rules in place yesterday. The voluntary rules would result in companies providing their own inspectors (while keeping one from the USDA in every plant), making it essentially a move to privatize the inspections. It will also mean fewer inspectors per plants, with each inspector looking at 140 birds per minute. Read more

Documentary ‘Resistance’ Takes on Antibiotic Misuse on Farms

The new documentary, Resistance opens with the story of Jessie Beam, who contracted an antibiotic-resistant strain of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in his early teens. The infection presented as run-of-the-mill soreness and fever at first, but his condition soon deteriorated until ultimately he fell into a coma. Beam survived the infection but has lasting mobility and health limitations. And he’s not alone.

The film presents other stories similar to his: An active older man loses the use of his legs after contracting a staph infection while surfing. A young family loses their 18-month old son to an antibiotic-resistant infection within 24 hours. Rather than seeming trite or emotionally manipulative, these stories underline the real danger of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: Infection can happen to anyone no matter how old or how healthy. Read more