Recent Articles About Agroecology

This Land is Our Land?

Imagine a country where ideologues bent on land reform turn agriculture into the plaything of the world’s richest investors, and poor local farmers are locked out of millions of acres prime agricultural land. Then stop imagining some African country run by a despot and his friends and start picturing the United States. Rural America is on the cusp of one of the greatest transfers of land in its history and no one’s talking about it. Read more

Symphony of the Soil: A Loveletter to What Grows Everything

For those of you who have seen Dirt: The Movie, Food, Inc., or any other film with commentary by Michael Pollan or Vanadana Shiva, here is another important film to add to the collection: The Symphony of the Soilwritten, directed and produced by Deborah Koons Garcia. Koons Garcia is known for her seminal film on the food system, The Future of Food, and has once again created another extraordinary film. Read more

Upcoming: Bill Moyers Speaks to Wendell Berry on PBS

Where would the food movement be if it were not for Wendell Berry? His book, The Unsettling of America, is the seminal work looking at how our industrial food system has effected our land and our culture. At 79 years old, he is still dedicating himself to shifting our environmental consciousness. This week, Bill Moyers profiles Berry, one of America’s most influential writers, a passionate advocate for the earth, whose prolific career includes more than 40 books of poetry, novels, short stories, and essays, in Wendell Berry: Poet & Prophet. Read more

The Power Is In Your Palm

Rainforest Action Network’s (RAN) ambitious new campaign, The Last Stand of the Orangutan, aims to save some of the world’s most important rainforests and the last remaining wild orangutans from “Conflict Palm Oil.” It’s one of the biggest campaigns we’ve ever launched. Read more

TCHO: Changing Chocolate

TCHO (pronounced “choh”—the “t” is silent), a phonetic spelling for the first syllable of chocolate, masterly mixes alchemy and artistry to produce award-winning organic, beyond fair trade chocolate from its Pier 17 headquarters along the San Francisco bay. Read more

Native Abundance and the Wisdom of Native Food Practices

Food is one of the greatest gifts Mother Earth gives to us (probably a very close second behind the oxygen we need to breath). It is amazing how you can place a tiny seed in the soil and weeks to months later a plant emerges with edible fruits or vegetables. Despite what the seed and fertilizer companies tell us, all the planet needs to grow food is healthy soil, water, and sunshine. Lend some love and a helping hand, and you have a full-fledged garden or small farm. Read more

Miracle Gro Gone Wild

Last week, National Geographic took on the explosive impact that the widespread use of chemical nitrogen fertilizer to boost crop production has on human health and the environment. Scientists have been leading a clarion call about the impacts of excess nitrogen for decades, but the issue remains little known, even though the impacts touch every part of our lives. Read more

Debunking GE Myths. Again.

Twitter-land was abuzz last week with news that a formerly ardent critic of genetic engineering (GE) has recanted his position. Mark Lynas gave a long mea culpa speech at the Oxford Farming Conference, in which he apologized to the world for tearing up GE crops back in the day, and for what he described as his “anti-science environmentalism.”

Unfortunately, Lynas then went on to ignore the weight of scientific evidence (more on that below). He claimed that GE crop production is good for biodiversity and necessary to feed the world, that organic farming is bad, and that “there is no reason at all why avoiding chemicals should be better for the environment.” He then quickly slammed the door shut on public debate, pronouncing “discussion over.” Many of us in the global scientific community were left shaking our heads, bemused if disappointed in Lynas’ anti-science rhetorical flourishes. Read more