Farms with a Future Decodes Farm Success

Farmer Rebecca Thistlethwaite never anticipated that she would start a family farm, scale it 430 percent, and then close it all within six years. But then, who would? Despite their farms closing, the light at the end of their 80-hour farming workweek tunnel turned out to be enlightenment. She, her husband, and daughter took a year off of farming not to rest, but to search for the most innovative and successful farming models across the U.S. Their time off-farm proved invaluable and has manifested into an essential handbook for running a truly sustainable farm: her new book, Farms with a Future.  Read more

Another Farmer Jane! Lisa Kivirist

Lisa Kivirist is a bonafide Farmer Jane in Wisconsin where she runs her family farm with the help of her husband and son Liam. Off grid and creative, she and her husband have figured out how to make a living in a rural place – something that’s not really easy to do. Lisa is also a Kellogg Food and Society Policy Fellow specializing in the role of women in agriculture and speaks on the subject frequently.

We are honored to share some of Lisa’s insights about why working in agriculture is the perfect fit for women entrepreneurs and ecopreneurs in this article within an article. Read on for some serious inspiration. Read more

Profiling Women Changing the Way We Eat: Suzanne Ashworth

Temra Costa is a sustainable food and farming advocate and author of Farmer Jane: Women Changing the Way We Eat. Civil Eats will feature her profiles of some of America’s women farmers and food advocates over the coming weeks.

On the banks of the Sacramento River, farm crops are the beneficiaries of centuries of natural flooding that have added rich sediment to the soil’s fabric. The longest river within California, the Sacramento, stretches from Mount Shasta all the way down to the Delta, where it joins with the San Joaquin before splurging out into the Suisun Bay just north of the San Francisco. The story of the Sacramento is as rich as its soil as Native Americans traversed its banks long before Interstate 5 was put in. Read more

Profiling Women Changing the Way We Eat: Molly Rockamann

Temra Costa is a sustainable food and farming advocate and author of Farmer Jane: Women Changing the Way We Eat. Civil Eats will feature her profiles of some of America’s women farmers and food advocates over the coming weeks.

Molly Rockamann (pictured: Karen, Molly, Vicki, Danielle) will forever be remembered as the apprentice at UC Santa Cruz’s Farm and Garden Program that made “Farm Grease, The Musical,” happen. This 28 year-old farmer grew up playing in the racks of her grandmother’s costume shop and with a family that made variety shows a priority at nearly all functions. So it’s not surprising that Molly continues to weave art, dance, and music into her farm in Ferguson, Missouri. Read more

Profiling Women Changing the Way We Eat: Zoe Holloman

Temra Costa is a sustainable food and farming advocate and author of Farmer Jane: Women Changing the Way We Eat. Civil Eats will feature her profiles of some of America’s women farmers and food advocates over the coming weeks.

In a time when kids don’t know the difference between potatoes and rocks, it’s refreshing that grassroots organizations are working to rebuild their community’s food economy and teaching invaluable skills of food production and sustainability to our next generation of eaters. I feel sympathetic towards youth today, they have to juggle mixed messages about what to eat while our world goes streaming into cyber space. They are the ones that are charged with putting a new foot forward to solve our current challenges of industrial food and the obesity and diabetes epidemics. Organizations such as Growing Power in Milwaukee and Chicago, The Food Project, and our featured organization, The Massachusetts Avenue Project (MAP) in Buffalo, New York, are showing kids how food is grown and are simultaneously teaching them critical life lessons in health, nutrition, environment, and business.

This brings us to Zoe Holloman, an educator and organizer for MAP Read more

Profiling Women Changing the Way We Eat: Nikki Henderson

Temra Costa is a sustainable food and farming advocate and author of Farmer Jane: Women Changing the Way We Eat. Civil Eats will feature her profiles of some of America’s women farmers and food advocates over the coming weeks.

Farmer Jane caught up with newly appointed Executive Director of People’s Grocery, Nikki Henderson, to get the inside scoop on what brought this dynamic woman to the West Coast from Brooklyn. As Executive Director, Nikki will be spending her time working to address one of the most important questions of the food movement: How can the sustainable food movement increase the health and well-being of economically disadvantaged people? In Nikki’s case, the people of West Oakland. Read more