Approximately 40 percent of the food we produce in the U.S. goes to waste, and only 5 percent of that waste is being recycled. In other words, there is a lot of room for positive change.

For this segment of the Perennial Plate, we followed along on garbage trucks in Boulder (a zero-waste city) and went behind the scenes at the Heartland Biogas Project near LaSalle, Colorado. The project is a collaboration between EDF Energy and A1 Organics and it combines food waste and animal waste in an anaerobic digester system to produce biogas for the region. And while creating energy from food waste will never be as sustainable as preventing waste in the first place, as Scott Pexton of A1 Organics describes it, it’s “one rung up the ladder from composting.” Read more

The first film from Season 4 of The Perennial Plate, our web documentary series about sustainable food, takes place in Del Norte, Colorado. It follows Keri Brandt, a former vegetarian and associate professor of Sociology and Gender and Women’s Studies at Fort Lewis University, as she shares how she came to terms with raising and eating animals after marrying into a Colorado ranching family. The Off family has been raising cattle for close to 150 years in Southern Colorado, where there’s a long history of ranching. Read more

We recently came back from five weeks of filming in India and Sri Lanka. We spent a lot of time researching story ideas, but one topic we knew we wanted to cover was seed saving and farmer suicides in India.  In case you aren’t familiar, there have been over 270,000 farmer suicides in the country over the last 15 years (most are cotton farmers).  There are many theories about what circumstances have led to this rash of deaths, but for Dr. Vandana Shiva, the reasons are clear: GMOs. Read more

On May 9, 2011, my girlfriend and I set out from Minneapolis on a road trip across the country.  The journey was not for sightseeing, instead we were on a mission: To tell stories about “real food” in America.  From that moment on, every week for a year, we released a 5-10-minute video about sustainable food across the country for our online documentary series, The Perennial Plate. The last video from our road trip was recently released.

We haven’t just been profiling young farmers and back-to-the-landers, we have been engaging with folks who went organic because they had gotten sick from conventional food, or fished and hunted because it was their only option.  Our broad scope of stories let us encounter every type of American that was in search of good food.

Along the way, we found no shortage of people to film.  Upon our departure we called out to the interweb for ideas and were flooded with stories from across the nation.  Armed with this catalogue and our own interests in experiencing the inspiring and the unique, we set off. Read more

In the event of a nuclear disaster, zombies taking over the planet, or industrial food collapse, you’d want to be friends with the subject of our latest film. It’s a meditation on survival and the beauty of doing things that are no longer necessary, but still worth doing. It takes place on a fall day in Andalusia, Alabama where we (The Perennial Plate crew) collected invasive Corbicula Clams with Jimmy and Sierra Stiles. After wading in the river looking for the creatures, we cooked them over a fire… made by hand. Watch: Read more