Editor’s Note: Thank a Farmer

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It’s high summer and we’re lucky to be reaping the bounty of the hard work that farmers did earlier this year. Having worked on several farms across the U.S., I know that this is serious crunch time. Farmers are not only harvesting the fruits of their labors, but they’re also planting fall crops.

Alan Guebert: Looking Back to Farm Forward

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Alan Guebert is an agriculture insider. For the last two decades, he has been chronicling and responding to farm politics in the award-winning and popular syndicated column “The Farm and Food File” from his home in Southern Illinois. Now, he’s hoping to reach out beyond that audience with a book he has co-authored with his… Read More

From App Design to Farming: Training the Next Generation

Fallon Johnson, a “capstone” student, works the field with the help of an AmeriCorps volunteer. Credit: Ruthie King.

A group gathers around an outdoor table set with kale salad, speckled bayo beans and rice, and pesto vinaigrette. It’s lunchtime on day four of the first-ever quarter of the Grange Farm School, a new working farm in rural Mendocino County, California, where up to 10 students from around the world live, work, and study on-site for three months at a time. Students engage in 25 hours of “experiential learning” per week, which includes classroom lessons, field trips, building projects, livestock management, and row-crop farming. Accredited through nearby Mendocino College, students pay $3,000 for tuition, room, and board, and receive a certificate as well as four college credits after successful completion of one three-month quarter. Read More

The Big Money Battle to Sway Americans’ Food Choices

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When it comes to food in America, we’re witnessing a sea change. Organic sales jumped 11 percent last year. Meanwhile about 84 percent of U.S. consumers now say they buy at least some organic food and two-thirds of Americans are in favor of requiring labeling on products containing genetically modified (GMO) ingredients. So it’s not surprising that some large food companies are spending money to coax consumers back to their side of the aisle. Read More

5 Things to Know About 2,4-D, the “Possibly” Cancer-Causing Herbicide

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The majority of America’s farms rely heavily on herbicides—lots of them. So when the World Health Organization (WHO) classified the United States’ most widely used weed-killer, glyphosate, as “probably” carcinogenic to humans three months ago, it was big news.

Now, the same group–the WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has concluded that 2,4-D, another commonly used weed killer, is “possibly” carcinogenic to humans. Here’s what you need to know about the decision and the chemical, which is the third most-widely used herbicide in the U.S. Read More