A Sustainable Bison Rancher With a Wild Idea

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For years Dan O’Brien raised cattle on his ranch in the Black Hills of South Dakota. After enduring beef’s punishing boom and bust cycle and experiencing first-hand the environmental toll that cattle took on his land, O’Brien made a dramatic change. He started raising North American Bison*, the great icon of the Great Prairie, instead.

All the News That’s Fit to Eat: Soda, Rainforests, and Peanut Butter Felons

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It’s been a busy week in food news; catch up with us here.

1. Soda Makers Coca-Cola, PepsiCo and Dr Pepper Join in Effort to Cut Americans’ Drink Calories (New York Times)

This week, the American Beverage Association announced that major soft drink companies were pledging to reduce beverage calories consumed per person nationally by 20 percent by 2025. This might sound like a big deal, but if you read the fine print, you’ll see that the companies are not planning to sell fewer products. Rather, they’re “expand[ing] the presence of low- and no-calorie drinks, as well as drinks sold in smaller portions.” And as author and New York University nutrition professor Marion Nestle points out: soda sales are already on the decline. If the industry is serious about helping Americans drink fewer sugary beverages, it would drop its $2 million opposition to soda taxes in San Francisco and Berkeley. Read More

Organic vs. ‘Climate-Smart': Can the UN Fix Farming in Time?

Photo by Johan Larson.

From the United Nations Climate Summit to the People’s Climate March and the accompanying Flood Wall Street action, all eyes have been on the climate this week.

Amidst heated discussions of global policy change, greenhouse gases, and emissions caps, food and farming–and the impact they are having on our changing climate—were also in the spotlight. After all, agriculture is one of largest contributors of human-caused emissions. Read More

As More Schools Turn to Food Fundraising, FarmRaiser Takes it Local

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When Mark Abbott’s son was in fourth grade, his local elementary school recruited students and their families to participate in a fundraiser for the school. After successfully selling cookie dough and candy to friends and family, Abbott’s son remarked that he had just sold $400 worth of things the family would never eat at home. “It’s too bad we couldn’t try something healthy like apples,” said his son. Read More

Choices Can Slice School Food Waste

Gloria Restrepo, a teacher’s assistant at Harris Bilingual Elementary School in Fort Collins, Colo., helps students choose their lunch. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

This post is part of the series Tossed Out – Food Waste in America from Harvest Public Media.

Lunch time at Harris Bilingual Elementary School in Fort Collins, Colo., displays all the usual trappings of a public school cafeteria: Star Wars lunch boxes, light up tennis shoes, hard plastic trays and chocolate milk cartons with little cartoon cows. It’s pizza day, the most popular of the week, and kids line up at a salad bar before receiving their slice.

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Beyond The Kibbutz: A Jewish Farm Renaissance

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Editor’s note: This is the first in a multipart series about the connections between faith and farming.

 

Every fall, Paul Dinberg builds a kind of thatch-roofed hut on his 10-acre farm in Ridgefield, Washington. This “sukkah,” a ceremonial structure Jews are commanded to construct and (for the very observant) live in for the holiday of Sukkot, commemorates the Israelites’ 40 years of desert-wandering. But sukkahs also have agricultural roots, possibly harking back to temporary structures ancient Jewish farmers would live in during harvest time. For a modern-day Jewish farmer like Dinberg, that gives Sukkot—which begins at sundown October 8 this year—special meaning. “We observe all the different festivals, but as a family, Sukkot is our favorite,” he says. “What gives me satisfaction is the connection to the agricultural cycle.” Read More

March Today, Eat a Low-Carbon Diet Tomorrow

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Today, hundreds of thousands of people around the world will take to the streets to fight for our lives. People’s Climate Marches are being organized in dozens of U.S. cities and a whopping 158 countries, from Burundi to Brazil to Nepal. Marchers are demanding international leaders to commit to serious emissions reductions and polluting industries to clean up their practices. Climate-impacted communities–from Hurricane Sandy survivors in New York City to indigenous peoples displaced by rainforest destruction in South America–will put a face on the urgency of this call to action. Read More

All the News That’s Fit to Eat: Obama Acts on Antibiotics, Cargill Sues Syngenta, and a Winery Shutters

Laguna Lake in San Luis Obispo dries out during the California drought. Photo credit: docentjoyce via Flickr.

Check out some of the food news stories that grabbed our attention this week.

1. White House Unveils Plan to Curb Antibiotic Resistance (Various)

President Obama released a plan to combat the rise of antibiotic resistant bacteria, a problem the administration says poses a “serious threat to public health, national security, and the economy.” Highlights of the plan include a report that outlines goals and strategies to combat the issue, as well as an executive order that creates a task force and advisory council to put those strategies into action. While the effort undoubtedly sheds light on the crisis of antibiotic resistance, which costs the U.S. economy at least $20 billion a year, some critics argue that the plan doesn’t put enough pressure on one of the biggest culprits: animal agriculture. Read More