Finally, a ‘Kickstarter’ for Sustainable Food Projects

Barnraiser front page

Four years ago, Marissa Guggiana and Tia Harrison founded The Butcher’s Guild, a network of artisanal butchers dedicated to supplying conscientious consumers’ growing demand for humanely-raised meat. But like any young organization, they had big ideas without a budget to match. Growing in membership, they hoped to hold their third national conference this fall called… Read More

Local Food By Boat: The Vermont Sail Freight Project

The Vermont Sail Freight Project stops in Kingston, NY. Photo by Jim Peppler

Maritime museums are nostalgic places full of black and white photographs of old sails and rugged seafarers. Ornate boats hint at centuries of technological progress and suggest that craftsmanship has suffered as a result. But the old became new again recently at the Hudson Maritime Museum in New York, when a sailboat arrived to sell agricultural goods from upriver. Visitors caught a glimpse of a river-based local food economy—a vestige of the past and a harbinger of an alternative future. Read More

More Crops Per Drop: No-Till Farming Combats Drought

Soil that is left un-tilled stays cooler and retains more moisture. Photo courtesy of the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service

Paul and Elizabeth Kaiser of Northern California’s Singing Frogs Farm grows fruit and vegetables completely without machinery, a system Paul refers to as “non-mechanized, no-till.” He said goodbye to his tractor and tiller seven years ago after he felt he was unnecessarily harming wildlife, saw too many machines break down, and watched his soil quality decrease. Now, his eight-acre farm has a robust community supported agriculture (CSA) program, and his soil is full of life. Read More

After Mine Disaster, Alaska’s Salmon Fishermen Want Change

mine near salmon fishery

Here in Alaska, salmon season is in full swing. Fishermen are working hard and celebrating a good catch that has already topped 100 million salmon. I have been fishing here for nearly two decades, beginning alongside my father on a Bristol Bay gillnetter at 17 before getting my own boat. I’m proud to be part of an industry that feeds the world with healthy, sustainably harvested wild fish. Read More

All The News That’s Fit to Eat: Jamie Oliver, GMO Labeling in Colorado, and Latino Farmers

Jamie Oliver wants to protect European meat from American growth hormones and other chemicals. Photo: Mr Pics / Shutterstock.com

It might be the end of Summer, but the food news doesn’t go fishing. Here’s what we read this week that caught our eye.

1. Don’t Let Americans Put Hormones and Pesticides in Our Dinner, Warns Jamie Oliver as He Launches Latest Food Offensive (Daily Mail)

Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver is publicly opposing the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) in a new campaign. Oliver points to the fact that the agreement would open the doors to sales of foods containing ingredients that are banned in the EU, such as arsenic in chicken feed, ractopamine–a common drug used to make pigs grow faster in the U.S.—and the milk-producing hormone rBST. “We don’t have hormones in our meat, that’s banned. But not over there. We don’t have hundreds of poisons and pesticides that have been proven to be carcinogenic. They do. Their laws, their set-up, their safety regulations are nowhere near ours,” he told the UK’s Daily Mail. Read More

Pregnant? Here’s Why That Tuna Sandwich Might Be a Bad Choice

tuna

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed new dietary guidelines for fish consumption. They’re very similar to the 2004 guidelines, with a few notable changes for pregnant women. The FDA kept its recommended limit of 12 ounces of fish per week for these women–but also established, for the first time, a minimum recommendation of eight ounces, saying pregnant and breastfeeding women should “eat more fish that is lower in mercury in order to gain important developmental and health benefits.” Read More

Faces and Visions of the Food Movement: Karen Washington, ‘Queen of Urban Gardening’

Karen Washingon food movement

In the early 1990s, after years of working as a physical therapist, Karen Washington noticed that many of her patients were steadily gaining weight and struggling with diabetes. She realized the people seeking treatment shared something else in common—a lack of fresh produce in their diets. The connection hit home when Washington saw her own son experience the same ailments she heard from her patients. The lifelong New Yorker and dedicated mother vowed to do better for her family and her community. Read More